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Faulkner's Geographies$
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Jay "Watson and Ann J. "Abadie

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781496802279

Published to University Press of Mississippi: September 2016

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781496802279.001.0001

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date: 17 October 2018

A Daughter’s Geography: William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, and a New Mapping of “The Black South”

A Daughter’s Geography: William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, and a New Mapping of “The Black South”

Chapter:
(p.129) A Daughter’s Geography: William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, and a New Mapping of “The Black South”
Source:
Faulkner's Geographies
Author(s):

Farah Jasmine Griffin

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781496802279.003.0009

This essay discusses Faulkner’s centrality to my pedagogical and critical project, which seeks to configure the black South as a cultural, economic, and political space made up of the United States South, the Caribbean, and parts of Central America.  By comparing and contrasting representations of New Orleans and Haiti in Faulkner’s Absalom, Absalom! and Zora Neale Hurston’s Mules and Men and Tell My Horse, the essay concludes that these two Southern writers give birth to a generation of black women who set their texts in a black South first imagined by these two foundational writers.

Keywords:   Hurston, Faulkner, Haiti, New Orleans, Black South

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