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Red Scare Racism and Cold War Black Radicalism$
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James Zeigler

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781496802385

Published to University Press of Mississippi: January 2017

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781496802385.001.0001

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date: 15 November 2018

Cold War Civil Rights and Cultural Rhetoric Studies

Cold War Civil Rights and Cultural Rhetoric Studies

Chapter:
(p.3) Introduction Cold War Civil Rights and Cultural Rhetoric Studies
Source:
Red Scare Racism and Cold War Black Radicalism
Author(s):

James Zeigler

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781496802385.003.0001

This chapter argues for the value of cultural rhetoric studies to examine the influence of anticommunism on the civil rights movement. Drawn from Steven Mailloux’s rhetorical formulation of Foucault’s discourse analysis, the approach is illustrated by a reading of a political cartoon from Ollie Harrington’s Bootsie and Friends. The discussion establishes that state authorities and civil institutions used the emerging Cold War Red Scare to frustrate anti-racist activism that was dedicated to the “Double V” campaign’s promise of following the victory over Nazism with the defeat of Jim Crow fascism in America. Affiliating the book’s investigation of Cold War civil rights with the scholarship of Mary Dudziak, Gerald Horne, Manning Marable, Ellen Schrecker, Penny Von Eschen, and others, the chapter also introduces the topic of black radical responses to the Cold War by Martin Luther King Jr. and the exiled writers Richard Wright, C.L.R. James, and Frank Marshall Davis.

Keywords:   Cold war, Civil rights, Anticommunism, Cultural rhetoric studies, Foucault

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