Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Woman Fantastic in Contemporary American Media Culture$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Elyce Rae Helford, Shiloh Carroll, Sarah Gray, and Michael R. II Howard

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781496808714

Published to University Press of Mississippi: September 2018

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781496808714.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of
date: 19 December 2018

Placing Parker: Negotiating the Hegemonic Binary in Leverage

Placing Parker: Negotiating the Hegemonic Binary in Leverage

Chapter:
(p.132) Placing Parker: Negotiating the Hegemonic Binary in Leverage
Source:
The Woman Fantastic in Contemporary American Media Culture
Author(s):

Elyce Rae Helford

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781496808714.003.0008

Extending the significance of race and class in the first two chapters, Elyce Rae Helford adds attention to sexuality in “Positioning Parker: Negotiating the Hegemonic Binary in Leverage.” Through a queer feminist lens, Helford explores popular culture’s reliance on the doctrine of natural kinds and hegemonic binarism—where the human world is divided into two mandatory, privileged, distinct, and non-overlapping categories. She posits the character of Parker in TNT’s action-drama Leverage (2008-2012) as exemplification of the Woman Fantastic through attention to the ways in which character history and superheroic (or anti-heroic) thieving abilities challenge gender absolutes. Simultaneously, argues Helford, Parker’s romantic relationship with the series’ African American computer hacker character challenges the combined effects of incest and miscegenation taboos. This case study illustrates hegemonic negotiation of the theory of natural kinds that continues to dominate popular culture.

Keywords:   Leverage, Parker, Hegemonic binary, Doctrine of Natural Kinds, Queer

University Press of Mississippi requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.