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Captain Marvel and the Art of Nostalgia$
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Brian Cremins

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781496808769

Published to University Press of Mississippi: May 2018

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781496808769.001.0001

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date: 22 June 2018

“Brother, that Ain’t Imaginary!”

“Brother, that Ain’t Imaginary!”

Billy Batson and World War II

Chapter:
(p.73) Chapter 3 “Brother, that Ain’t Imaginary!”
Source:
Captain Marvel and the Art of Nostalgia
Author(s):

Brian Cremins

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781496808769.003.0004

Billy Batson and his alter ego Captain Marvel reached the height of their popularity during World War II. This chapter studies several of Billy’s wartime adventures, stories that artist C. C Beck often dismissed later in his career. In these narratives, Captain Marvel embodies aspects of the ideal American soldier figured as an innocent boy whose courage all but guarantees a victory over the Axis powers. The chapter also examines the social and cultural consequences of this idealized figure, especially on returning soldiers and their families.

Keywords:   Billy Batson, Captain Marvel, Comic books and soldiers, Comic books and World War II, Nostalgia and World War II

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