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Global Faulkner$
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Annette Trefzer and Ann J. Abadie

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9781604732115

Published to University Press of Mississippi: March 2014

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781604732115.001.0001

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date: 15 December 2017

On the Tragedies and Comedies of the New World Faulkner

On the Tragedies and Comedies of the New World Faulkner

Chapter:
(p.59) On the Tragedies and Comedies of the New World Faulkner
Source:
Global Faulkner
Author(s):

George B. Handley

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781604732115.003.0004

This chapter argues that the global Faulkner calls for a new kind of reader who abandons the regional and national models of literature and instead probes Faulkner’s relevance to New World cultures. This kind of reading “makes the boundaries of one’s community tenuous since the reader is brought out of bounds, beyond the confines of accepted knowledge and into the uncertain terrain of calls and echoes between and among communities, near and far.” The chapter brings two communities of readers into contact with each other. The translation of the parchments in Gabriel García Márquez’s One Hundred Years of Solitude functions similarly to Ike’s “translation” of the ledgers in “The Bear”: these documents are “repositories of the communities’ fragmented histories, transgressions, and genealogies—each containing the secret of incest and the implication of the reader in a history of transgressions.” Reading the ledgers or the parchments is neither purely an act of decoding a text nor an act of the imagination, but recognition that all knowledge is produced between author and reader, between “revelation” and “translation.”

Keywords:   William Faulkner, New World cultures, Gabriel García Márquez, ledgers

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