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God of ComicsOsamu Tezuka and the Creation of Post-World War II Manga$
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Natsu Onoda Power

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9781604732207

Published to University Press of Mississippi: March 2014

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781604732207.001.0001

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date: 19 November 2017

God of Comics, Master of Quotations

God of Comics, Master of Quotations

Chapter:
(p.152) 9 God of Comics, Master of Quotations
Source:
God of Comics
Author(s):

Natsu Onoda Power

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781604732207.003.0009

In Osamu Tezuka’s comics, various art forms, cultural products, and social and cultural discourses function as powerful intertexts with a set of meanings and histories. Tezuka’s works were consciously filled with references. This chapter offers a close textual analysis of Tezuka’s short work Curtain wa konya mo aoi (The Curtain Remains Blue Tonight), a 1958 thriller that marks several shifts and transitions in the history of manga as well as Tezuka’s career. These transitions range from the emergence of young female artists in the shojo manga industry, to the rise of gekiga, Tezuka’s brief return to medical science research, and the rise of mystery and thriller narratives. The chapter also shows how theater is deployed in The Curtain Remains Blue Tonight and looks at some of the characters. Furthermore, it considers how Japan and the Orient are addressed in the play and concludes with a discussion of its parody of Takarazuka Kagekidan’s kabuki adaptation.

Keywords:   comics, Osamu Tezuka, The Curtain Remains Blue Tonight, manga, shojo manga, gekiga, theater, Japan, Orient, kabuki

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