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The Rise of the American Comics ArtistCreators and Contexts$
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Paul Williams and James Lyons

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9781604737929

Published to University Press of Mississippi: March 2014

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781604737929.001.0001

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date: 22 October 2017

State of the Nation and the Freedom Fighters Arc

State of the Nation and the Freedom Fighters Arc

Chapter:
(p.57) Chapter Four State of the Nation and the Freedom Fighters Arc
Source:
The Rise of the American Comics Artist
Author(s):

Graham J. Murphy

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781604737929.003.0005

Scholars and critics have long paid attention to comic books, including the superhero narrative, which remains a topseller in a fiercely competitive North American marketplace. One example of a superhero narrative is DC Comics’s Uncle Sam and the Freedom Fighters, which debuted in National Comics #1 in July 1940 and features characters such as Uncle Sam, the Human Bomb, Black Condor, Phantom Lady, Miss America, and Red Torpedo. The Freedom Fighters was relaunched by Justin Gray and Jimmy Palmiotti in a multi-title narrative arc that culminates in the eight-issue limited series Uncle Sam and the Freedom Fighters (2006–2007). This chapter examines the Freedom Fighters arc and its fusion of adventurous escapism with pointed political commentary, and how its creators exploited the freedom of the comics medium to critique the erosion of civil liberties in the United States under the Bush administration. More specifically, it analyzes Freedom Fighters’ allegory of Bush-era post-9/11 America operating in the pretext of a War on Terror and national security.

Keywords:   comic books, DC Comics, Freedom Fighters, Justin Gray, Jimmy Palmiotti, escapism, comics, civil liberties, War on Terror, national security

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