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The Speeches of Fannie Lou Hamer
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The Speeches of Fannie Lou Hamer: To Tell It Like It Is

Maegan Parker Brooks and Davis W. Houck

Abstract

Most people who have heard of Fannie Lou Hamer are aware of the testimony that this Mississippi sharecropper and civil rights activist delivered at the 1964 Democratic National Convention. Far fewer are familiar with the speeches she delivered at the 1968 and 1972 conventions, to say nothing of addresses she gave closer to home, or with Malcolm X in Harlem, or even at the founding of the National Women’s Political Caucus. Until now, dozens of Hamer’s speeches have been buried in archival collections and in the basements of movement veterans. This book presents twenty-one of Hamer’s most import ... More

Keywords: civil rights, Fannie Lou Hamer, National Women’s Political Caucus, Democratic National Convention, Malcolm X, Harlem, Berkeley, black freedom movement, speeches, testimonies

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2010 Print ISBN-13: 9781604738223
Published to University Press of Mississippi: March 2014 DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781604738223.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Maegan Parker Brooks, editor

Davis W. Houck, editor

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Contents

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“I Don’t Mind My Light Shining,”

Maegan Parker Brooks, and Davis W. Houck

Federal Trial Testimony, Oxford, Mississippi, December 2, 1963

Maegan Parker Brooks, and Davis W. Houck

“We’re On Our Way,”

Maegan Parker Brooks, and Davis W. Houck

“I’m Sick and Tired of Being Sick and Tired,”

Maegan Parker Brooks, and Davis W. Houck

“The Only Thing We Can Do Is to Work Together,”

Maegan Parker Brooks, and Davis W. Houck

“What Have We to Hail?,”

Maegan Parker Brooks, and Davis W. Houck

“To Tell It Like It Is,”

Maegan Parker Brooks, and Davis W. Houck

“To Make Democracy a Reality,”

Maegan Parker Brooks, and Davis W. Houck

“America Is a Sick Place, and Man Is on the Critical List,”

Maegan Parker Brooks, and Davis W. Houck

“Until I Am Free, You Are Not Free Either,”

Maegan Parker Brooks, and Davis W. Houck

“Is It Too Late?,”

Maegan Parker Brooks, and Davis W. Houck

“Nobody’s Free Until Everybody’s Free,”

Maegan Parker Brooks, and Davis W. Houck

“If the Name of the Game Is Survive, Survive,”

Maegan Parker Brooks, and Davis W. Houck

“We Haven’t Arrived Yet,”

Maegan Parker Brooks, and Davis W. Houck