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The Speeches of Fannie Lou HamerTo Tell It Like It Is$
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Maegan Parker Brooks and Davis W. Houck

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9781604738223

Published to University Press of Mississippi: March 2014

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781604738223.001.0001

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date: 22 October 2017

Speech on Behalf of the Alabama Delegation at the 1968 Democratic National Convention, Chicago, Illinois, August 27, 1968

Speech on Behalf of the Alabama Delegation at the 1968 Democratic National Convention, Chicago, Illinois, August 27, 1968

Chapter:
(p.84) Speech on Behalf of the Alabama Delegation at the 1968 Democratic National Convention, Chicago, Illinois, August 27, 1968
Source:
The Speeches of Fannie Lou Hamer
Author(s):

Maegan Parker Brooks

Davis W. Houck

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781604738223.003.0010

The 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago was hounded by controversy stemming from protests of the country’s foreign policy, particularly the war in Vietnam. Civil rights activists in Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi initiated three Credentials Committee hearings at the convention. The activist coalition from Mississippi had carefully followed the national Democratic Party’s rules for the establishment of an integrated, representative party, while the state’s official delegation had blatantly disregarded these provisions. The Georgia challengers managed to receive half of their state’s delegate seats for the convention, but Alabama’s delegation was not seated at all. On August 27, 1968, Fannie Lou Hamer spoke on behalf of the Alabama delegation at the Chicago convention. This chapter reproduces Hamer’s speech, in which she confronted the Democratic Party for its hypocrisy.

Keywords:   speech, Democratic National Convention, civil rights, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Democratic Party, Fannie Lou Hamer, delegation, Chicago

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