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The Politics of Paul Robeson's Othello$
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Lindsey R. Swindall

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9781604738247

Published to University Press of Mississippi: March 2014

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781604738247.001.0001

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date: 19 January 2019

Robeson, Othello, and the Politics of the Cold War

Robeson, Othello, and the Politics of the Cold War

Chapter:
(p.135) Chapter Six Robeson, Othello, and the Politics of the Cold War
Source:
The Politics of Paul Robeson's Othello
Author(s):

Lindsey R. Swindall

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781604738247.003.0007

This chapter examines the ways in which Robeson utilized creative performative strategies to circumvent his confinement in the United States during the early Cold War. Despite persistent government repression, Robeson maintained his internationalist antifascist analysis which emphasized civil rights for African Americans and self-determination for Africans. The final monologue of Othello remained prominent in his Cold War repertoire, reflecting the importance of that role in his artistic legacy and the capricious passport ban which prevented him from again donning Othello’s robes onstage.

Keywords:   Paul Robeson, creative performance, antifascism, civil rights, African American, self-determination, passport ban

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