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Black Greek-Letter Organizations 2.0New Directions in the Study of African American Fraternities and Sororities$

Matthew W. Hughey and Gregory S. Parks

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9781604739213

Published to University Press of Mississippi: March 2014

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781604739213.001.0001

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(p.311) Appendix

(p.311) Appendix

Source:
Black Greek-Letter Organizations 2.0
Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi

Advisory Board Members

  • Edward G. Whipple, Ph.D., Advisory Board Chair

    Dr. Whipple is vice president for student affairs at Bowling Green State University. He is also an adjunct associate professor in the Department of Higher Education and Student Affairs and serves as a member of the graduate faculty at Bowling Green State University. Dr. Whipple earned his B.A. from Willamette University, M.A.T. from Northwestern University (English), and Ph.D. from Oregon State University. Dr. Whipple is editor of New Challenges for Greek Letter Organizations: Transforming Fraternities and Sororities into Learning Communities.

  • Ronald Binder, Ph.D.

    Dr. Binder is associate director of Residence Life for Greek Affairs at Bowling Green State University and is the 2006 president of the Association of Fraternity Advisors, an organization dedicated to providing resources, recognition, and support for fraternity/sorority advising professionals and those invested in the fraternal experience.

  • Daniel Bureau, M.A., Ph.D. Candidate

    Mr. Bureau is a doctoral candidate in Higher Education Student Affairs at the University of Indiana. He is also the 2004 president of the Association of Fraternity Advisors and is the current associate editor of The Oracle: The Research Journal of the Association of Fraternity Advisors.

  • Jason Callaman, M.S.

    Mr. Callaman is an associate with the Friends Research Institute, an organization dedicated to managing the administrative details, back-office functions, and nonscientific paperwork (e.g.: Institutional Review Board, ethics boards, etc.) of various research endeavors.

  • (p.312) Charles Eberly, Ph.D.

    Charles Eberly is a professor of counseling and student development at Eastern Illinois University. Dr. Eberly graduated from Michigan State University in Higher Education Administration. Dr. Eberly’s primary teaching emphasis is in College Student Affairs and his research interests include American college fraternities, enrollment management, and student development. He is active with the Center for the Study of the College Fraternity.

  • Laura Morgan Roberts, Ph.D.

    Roberts is a professor of organizational behavior in the School of Business at Harvard University. Her research identifies systems and practices that build competence, agency, and purposeful connection in work organizations. Her work has been published in the Harvard Business Review, Academy of Management Review, and the Journal of Organizational Behavior. She is a member of the Academy of Management, American Psychological Association, Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, and Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.

  • Corey D. B. Walker, Ph.D.

    Professor Walker is on faculty at the Africana Studies Department at Brown University. His research revolves around a series of critical investigations into the philosophical and theological problems of modern thought and political practice. Prior to joining the faculty at Brown in 2006, Professor Walker was on faculty at the University of Virginia (2003–2006), director of the Center for the Study of Local Knowledge at the University of Virginia (2002–2003), and visiting professor at the Historisches Institut at Friedrich-Schiller-Universität Jena in Germany (2002). He is author of “The Freemasonry of the Race”: The Cultural Politics of Association and the Struggle for Democracy in America (University of Illinois Press, forthcoming) and is now working on a new book project entitled Between Transcendence and History: Theology, Critical Theory and the Politics of Liberation. Professor Walker also serves as an associate editor of the Journal of the American Academy of Religion, the top academic journal for the study of religion, and is a member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.

  • Deborah E. Whaley, Ph.D.

    Dr. Whaley is on faculty in the African American Studies department at Saint Louis University. Before coming to Saint Louis University she was on faculty at the University of Arizona, the University of Massachusetts, Boston, and the University of Kansas. She was also a visiting scholar at the Center for Cultural Studies at the University of California Santa Cruz, and is the recipient of a grant from the Monroe Trotter Institute for Black Culture. Trained as a cultural historian, she investigates Comparative American & Ethnic Studies, Popular and Visual Culture, Black Cultural Studies, and Feminist Theory. Professor Whaley (p.313) is a contributor to the anthologies Afro-Asian Encounters; African American Fraternities and Sororities: The Legacy and the Vision; and Fields Watered With Blood: Critical Essays on Margaret Walker. Whaley has also published in the journals Contours: A Journal of Africa and the Diaspora, The Journal of Pedagogy, Pluralism, and Practice, American Studies, 49th Parallel, and the Trotter Review. Her first book manuscript concerns the cultural and public sphere work of a historically black sorority.

Editorial Board Members

  • Laquite Blockson, Ph.D.

    Dr. Blockson is assistant professor of ethics and entrepreneurship at the College of Charleston’s (S.C.) School of Business and Economics. Blockson conducts research and teaches courses in minority-owned and women-owned businesses, business ethics/social responsibility, urban economic development, and organizational policy. A Cleveland, Ohio, native, she is an active member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc.

  • Daniel Bureau, Ph.D. Candidate

    Mr. Bureau is a doctoral candidate in Higher Education Student Affairs at the University of Indiana. He is also the 2004 president of the Association of Fraternity Advisors and is the current associate editor of The Oracle: The Research Journal of the Association of Fraternity Advisors.

  • Walter L. Burt, Ph.D.

    Dr. Burt is an assistant professor of educational leadership in the Department of Educational Leadership, Research & Technology at Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo, Michigan. Prior to coming to the WMU in August 2004, Dr. Burt served as project manager in the District Alliance Programs of the Stupski Foundation in Mill Valley, California. As project manager, Burt was responsible for leading school reform initiatives in the Paterson (Paterson, N.J.) and New Haven (New Haven, Conn.) public schools. From 1999 to 2003, he served as superintendent of schools in the school district of the City of Pontiac, Michigan. Burt is a former Mott Foundation Fellow, an Urban Health Initiative (UHI) Fellow with the Robert Woods Johnson Foundation, and a graduate of the Broad Foundation Fellow’s Executive Management Program for Urban Superintendents. With respect to his professional preparation, Dr. Burt holds a B.S. degree in biology from Alcorn State University, a master of arts (M.A.) degree in Educational Leadership from Eastern Michigan University, and a doctor of philosophy (Ph.D.) degree from The University of Michigan. Dr. Burt has published in numerous professional journals.

  • (p.314) Charles Eberly, Ph.D.

    Charles Eberly is a professor of counseling and student development at Eastern Illinois University. Dr. Eberly graduated from Michigan State University in higher education administration. His primary teaching emphasis is in college student affairs and his research interests include American college fraternities, enrollment management, and student development.

  • Stephanie Y. Evans, Ph.D.

    Dr. Stephanie Y. Evans is associate professor in African American Studies and Women’s Studies at the University of Florida in Gainesville. She is the author of Black Women in the Ivory Tower, 1850–1954: An Intellectual History. She has authored articles in the Florida Historical Quarterly, International Journal of the Humanities, The Griot, and Feminist Teacher. She is coeditor of African Americans and Community Engagement in Higher Education. In May 2003, she received her Ph.D. in African American Studies with a concentration in history and politics from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and in May 2002 earned a master’s degree in the same field. Also in 2002, she completed the Graduate Certificate Program in Advanced Feminist Studies. She is a proud member of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated. Dr. Evans has conducted research at sites including University of Dar es Salaam in Tanzania, Howard University’s Moorland-Spingarn Research Center in Washington, D.C., and through the University of Florida’s Paris Research Center in Paris, France. While completing her dissertation, Dr. Evans worked as assistant director for Youth Education Programs, Swearer Center for Public Service at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island. In the summer of 1999 she was a research intern at Stanford University’s Haas Center for Public Service. Her full portfolio is available online at www.ProfessorEvans.com.

  • Teri Fair, Ph.D.

    Dr. Teri Fair is an assistant professor in the Government Department at Suffolk University. In May 2006, Fair completed her doctorate of philosophy in political science from Clark Atlanta University in Atlanta, Georgia. As a professor of government, Dr. Fair teaches courses in race and public policy, minority politics, urban politics, and American democracy. She also collaborates with two nonprofit civic organizations on the Initiative for Diversity in Civic Leadership, a program designed to prepare people of color to political appointments and elective office. Dr. Fair is a member of the American Political Science Association, the National Conference of Black Political Scientists, and Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated, Psi Omega Chapter.

  • (p.315) Elizabeth C. Fine, Ph.D.

    Elizabeth C. Fine is professor and director of the Humanities Program in the Department of Interdisciplinary Studies at Virginia Tech. She served as the first chair of the Department of Interdisciplinary Studies from 2003 to 2007. Her research interests include cultural studies, African American folklore, performance studies, and Appalachian Studies. She is the author of Soulstepping: African American Step Shows, Performance, Culture, and Identity, coedited with Jean Haskell Speer, and The Folklore Text: From Performance to Print. She is an associate editor for Text and Performance Quarterly. Her articles have been published in such journals as the Journal of American Folklore, Semiotica, Communication Monographs, Communication Education, Journal of the Appalachian Studies Association, National Women’s Studies Association Journal, Southern Folklore, Literature in Performance, Annals of Tourism Research, Sprache und Sprechen, and The Drama Review, as well as in numerous books. She has also produced and directed two documentaries. She received her Ph.D. in communication from the University of Texas at Austin (1978), her M.A. in Rhetoric from the University of California, Berkeley (1973), and her B.S. in speech communication from the University of Texas at Austin (1971). She was awarded a Woodrow Wilson Fellowship in 1971, and the Outstanding Dissertation Award in the Humanities from the University of Texas in 1978. In 1993 she received the Lilla A. Heston Award for Outstanding Scholarship in Interpretation and Performance Studies.

  • Anna L. Green, Ph.D.

    Dr. Anna L. Green is an active member of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Incorporated and has served as an advisor. She is the founding president of Sisters of the Academy Institute, and coeditor of Sisters of the Academy: Emergent Black Women Scholars in Higher Education (Stylus, 2001) and Journey to the Ph.D.: How to Navigate the Process as African Americans. She is an assistant professor of psychology, education and management. Anna earned a doctorate degree in educational psychology from Florida State University, a master’s degree in educational psychology from Clark Atlanta University and bachelor’s degree in psychology from Xavier University of Louisiana.

  • Jeremy Harp, B.A.

    Jeremy Harp is a 2010 graduate of Yale University where he earned a B.A. in African American studies and political science. Jeremy has conducted research on how African Americans have influenced presidential elections since 1860 and the presence of African American males at Yale University in the early twentieth century. He is a member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.

  • (p.316) Ronald L. Jackson Ii, Ph.D.

    Ronald L. Jackson II is associate professor of culture and communication theory in the Department of Communication Arts & Sciences at the Pennsylvania State University. Dr. Jackson is the immediate past president of the Eastern Communication Association. He is author of several dozen articles in leading professional journals as well as the following books: The Negotiation of Cultural Identity, Think About It!, African American Communication: Identity and Culture (with Michael Hecht and Sidney Ribeau); African American Rhetorics: Interdisciplinary Perspectives (with Elaine Richardson); Scripting the Black Body: Intersections of Masculinity, Communication, Culture and Identity; Understanding African American Rhetoric (with Elaine Richardson); and Pioneers in African American Communication Research (with Sonja Givens). Dr. Jackson’s theory work includes the development of two paradigms coined “cultural contracts theory” and “black masculine identity theory.”

  • Amani S. Jennings, M.A.

    Amani Sedu Jennings is a resident of the Garden State of New Jersey, originally from the small town of Willingboro and currently residing in Perth Amboy. Amani received his undergraduate B.A. in 1997 from Jersey City State College in English and four years later his M.A. from the same institution (though renamed as New Jersey City University) in urban education. Amani has taught as a high school English and journalism teacher; a middle school English and creative writing teacher; and he currently serves as the assistant dean of students at New Jersey City University. Amani is a member of the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, currently serving as intake director for the Theta Psi Lambda Chapter (Somerset, New Jersey) and recording secretary for the New Jersey Association of Alpha Phi Alpha Chapters. Amani is also a Prince Hall Affiliated Freemason, serving as the senior warden of Mt. Zion Lodge #50 (MWPHGLNJ) located in Hackensack, New Jersey. He is also the husband of Monique Tyra and the father of three-month-old Malachi Xavier.

  • Michael Jennings, Ph.D.

    Dr. Jennings is a professor of educational leadership and policy studies at the University of Texas at San Antonio. He research interests include race, emancipatory scholarship, urban school reform, and minority student achievement/resiliency in education. He is an active member of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc.

  • Gina Lee-Olukoya, Ph.D.

    Dr. Lee-Olukoya holds a Ph.D. in higher education administration and is director of the Center for Student Leadership at Wichita State University. She is author of The Role of Hazing in the Culture of Historically Black Greek (p.317) Lettered Organizations, and a past executive board member of the Southeastern Panhellenic Conference.

  • Marcella L. Mccoy, Ph.D.

    Marcella L. McCoy attended Morgan State University in the first class of honors program scholars, served as president for Alpha Gamma chapter, Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., won awards for her writing and a graduate assistantship to Bowling Green State University in Ohio. At her new intellectual home, the leadership skills she developed at Morgan transferred naturally to graduate school. McCoy planned fundraisers, conferences, and events for the campuses’ minority graduate student population. These efforts won her “Outstanding Service” awards from the Department of Graduate College and Ethnic Studies upon completing the M.A. in mass communication and the Ph.D. in American culture studies. Between these degree programs, she wrote for the local black press as a staff writer and features editor. The Philadelphia native’s professional appointments have included a faculty position at Hampton University, visiting scholar at Ramapo College of New Jersey, assistant director of the Honors Program at Morgan State University, and her current position as director of the Honors Program at Philadelphia University. Dr. McCoy has contributed to publications about the African American experience and diversity in general, and consults on topics in African American studies, “What Professors Expect,” and conflict resolution.

  • Katrina Bell Mcdonald, Ph.D.

    Dr. McDonald joined the faculty at Johns Hopkins University in 1994 as a predoctoral scholar from the University of California, Davis. She now holds the title of associate professor of sociology and became tenured in the spring of 2006, the second black female ever to be awarded tenure in the School of Arts and Sciences or the School of Engineering. Dr. McDonald earned a bachelor of arts degree with honors in written communication from Mills College in 1983 (Oakland, Calif.); a master of arts degree in applied communication research from Stanford University in 1984 (Palo Alto, Calif.); a master of arts degree in sociology from the University of California, Davis, in 1990; and a Ph.D. in sociology from UC Davis in 1995. Just prior to entering the doctoral program she worked as a marketing research analyst with the San Francisco Chronicle/Examiner and as a consultant in survey research design and data analysis at the California State University, Hayward (now the California State University, East Bay). During her time as a doctoral student she taught courses on The Black Female, The Black Family, and Marriage and the Family, and conducted research on racial disparities in infant mortality and birth weight and on maternal support among African Americans. Her dissertation, “Sister-Friends: Re-Creating Maternal Support in the African-American Community,” focused on (p.318) the challenge of addressing maternal and child health issues across social class lines. At Johns Hopkins, McDonald teaches courses on The African-American Family, Contemporary Race Relations, Qualitative Research Methods, and Introductory Social Statistics. She also serves on the board of the newly established Center for Africana Studies, as a member of the Diversity Leadership Council, and as faculty advisor to the Black Graduate Students Association. She is a member of the American Sociological Association, the Association of Black Sociologists, the Hopkins Black Faculty and Staff Association, the Hopkins Population Center, Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc., and Bethel AME Church.

  • AndrÉ Mckenzie, Ed.D.

    André McKenzie received both his B.S. and M.S. in education from Illinois State University and both his M.Ed. and Ed.D. from Teachers College, Columbia University. He currently serves as vice president for Academic Support Services/ Special and Opportunity Programs at St. John’s University, New York. His 1985 dissertation thoroughly investigated BGLOs at four historically black colleges (Howard, Fisk and Lincoln University and Clark College) from 1920 to 1960. His publications include “In the Beginning: The Early History of the Divine Nine” in African American Fraternities and Sororities: The Legacy and the Vision; and “Diversity and Student Freedom” (coauthor), in Student Freedom Revisited: New Issues and Perspectives. Dr. McKenzie is a member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.

  • Sachiel Mondesir, M.A.

    Sachiel Mondesir is a native of Port-Au-Prince, Haiti, and grew up in Brooklyn, New York. He attended Stony Brook University where he received a bachelor in sociology, a master of arts in liberal studies, and a master of social work. He is the youngest of seven and the first in his family to obtain a master’s degree. Mr. Mondesir has worked as an academic counselor at Columbia University and at York College, and is currently working as a college advisor with high school students in Brooklyn. He is also an aspiring writer: poet, essayist, and novelist. Mr. Mondesir is a member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.

  • Malik Muhammad, Ph.D.

    Malik Muhammad is a clinical psychologist with specializations in diversity, racism, and multicultural issues. He is a member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Incorporated and was initiated on March 11, 2006, into the Zeta Sigma Lambda Chapter located in San Diego, California. Dr. Muhammad has an extensive background working with at-risk youth and families from low socioeconomic status. He has done research in the Department of Psychiatry at Stanford (p.319) University and is also a published author on alternative medicine and HIV-positive African Americans living with PTSD. His dissertation examined the styles of coping related to stress among HIV-positive African Americans. In his free time Malik likes to travel and do college outreach to minority students considering higher education. In the future Dr. Muhammad would like to be able to devote the majority of his time to developing resources to assist parents and educators in removing the barriers that prevent minorities from doing well in high school and college.

  • Katherine E. Peabody, B.A.

    Katie Peabody is a graduate of the University of Virginia (2010), with a bachelor of arts in political and social thought with a religious studies minor. Her research interests focus on the intersection between race, gender, and Christianity as they pertain to how women experience violence. She is a member of Pi Beta Phi Fraternity for Women.

  • Sandra Mizumoto Posey, Ph.D.

    Dr. Posey is a professor of California State Polytechnic University’s Inter-Disciplinary General Education Program. She is a folklorist who has researched the tradition of branding among BGLOs.

  • Bernadette Pruitt, Ph.D.

    Detroit, Michigan, native Bernadette Pruitt is associate professor of history at Sam Houston State University in Huntsville, Texas. Her research and teaching interests include African American urban history, internal migrations, Africana studies, race relations and ethnicity, recent United States history, and civil rights activism. She is completing her forthcoming book “For the Advancement of the Race”: The Great Migrations, Community Agency, and Work in Houston, Texas, 1900–1941 for Texas A & M University Press. A passionate and compassionate teacher, Professor Pruitt is the recipient of the 2004 Sammy Award for “Best Faculty Member Who Goes beyond the Call of Duty for Students.” Pruitt earned her B.A. and M.A. at Texas Southern University in Houston and the Ph.D. at the University of Houston. She is also a member of Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority Inc.

  • Bernice D. Ramirez, B.A.

    Bernice Ramirez of San Diego, California, graduated from the University of Virginia with a B.A. in political and social thought. She is currently serving as an Americorps VISTA member with Higher Achievement, an education non-profit based in Washington, D.C.

  • (p.320) Jason E. Shelton, Ph.D.

    Jason E. Shelton is a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Sociology at Rice University. He received his B.A. in 1998 at Kent State University. He earned both his M.A. (2000) and Ph.D. (2005) in sociology at the University of Miami. Dr. Shelton’s research interests include the socioeconomic and cultural sources of attitudinal variation among African Americans, the debate over race and class in the post–civil rights era, and immigration/acculturation processes among various racial/ethnic and religious groups. He is a fourth-generation member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity.

  • J. Goosby Smith, Ph.D.

    J. Goosby Smith is an associate professor of management at California State University Channel Islands. Her previous academic posts were at Pepperdine University and Butler University. Her M.B.A. and Ph.D. are in organizational behavior from Case Western Reserve University. Her undergraduate degree is from Spelman College. She is a member of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated, which she joined in February 1998 (Alpha Omega Chapter, Cleveland, Ohio).

  • Melvin Cleveland Terrell, Ph.D.

    Since 1988, Dr. Melvin Cleveland Terrell has served as vice president for student affairs and professor of counselor education at Northeastern Illinois University (NEIU) in Chicago, Illinois. Formerly, he served as director of minority affairs and adjunct assistant professor of educational leadership at the University of Toledo. He earned his M.Ed. (1974) in college student personnel with an emphasis on counseling from Loyola University (Chicago) and his Ph.D. in higher education administration and black studies from Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (1978). He is past president of the National Association of Student Affairs Professionals (NASAP) and has served as editor of the NASAP Journal since 1997, one of the leading student affairs journals in the nation. Dr. Terrell has authored over thirty publications. He coedited Creating and Maintaining Safe College Campuses: A Sourcebook for Evaluating and Enhancing Safety Programs. He received the 2004 NASPA Outstanding Contribution to Literature or Research Award and the 1990 Scott Goodnight Award for Outstanding Performance as a Student Personnel Administrator, NASPA, Region IV East, the first minority administrator to receive this prestigious recognition.

(p.321) Chapter Authors

  • Reynaldo Anderson, Ph.D.

    Reynaldo Anderson is an assistant professor of education at Harris-Stowe State University in Saint Louis, Missouri. He has presented and published extensive research documenting the African American experience. Currently, Anderson serves as the chairman of the Black Caucus of the National Communication Association. His research and teaching interests are in rhetorical criticism, African American studies, and social studies. He is a member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Inc. and 100 Black Men Inc. He is married to his college sweet-heart, Dr. Denise Hooks-Anderson, and has two daughters, Zari and Lauryn.

  • Tamara L. Brown, Ph.D., M.Div.

    Tamara L. Brown is an associate professor of psychology at the University of Kentucky. She is a founding member of the Pi Mu chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., at Longwood College in Virginia, and she is currently a member of the Lexington Alumnae chapter. Dr. Brown brings a deep sense of commitment to this project and an awareness of what information about BGLOs would be appealing to members of these organizations. Moreover, as a university professor, her training allows us to bring a number of critical questions to the topic that might be asked by scholars who might read this book. Moreover, she is a seminary-trained (master of divinity) and ordained clergy in the United Methodist Church, as well as a scholar who does research in the area of religiousness and spirituality and their connection to psychological health among African Americans.

  • Paul M. Buckley, Ph.D. Candidate

    Paul M. Buckley is a Ph.D. candidate in cultural foundations of education at Syracuse University and serves as the associate dean for the Student Life division at Andrews University. His research interests include critical race theories, masculinity in education and faith expression, and advanced student retention theory in higher education. His work with men includes fraternity advising, rites of passage programs for college men and teenagers, founding the Multicultural Empowerment Network (MEN) for men of color, and more. He presents widely at conferences, symposiums, churches, and community organizations.

  • Edith Wen-Chu Chen, Ph.D.

    Edith Wen-Chu Chen (Ph.D. sociology, UCLA) is an associate professor of Asian American studies at California State University, Northridge. Her research and teaching interests include Asian Pacific American women, race and ethnicity, Chinese in the Americas, and visual sociology. She is the editor (p.322) (coedited with Glenn Omatsu) for the pioneering teaching anthology and resource guide, Teaching about Asian Pacific Americans: Effective Activities, Strategies, and Assignments for Classrooms and Workshops. She has also previously published, “Constructing a Non-Asian Identity: Asian American Sisters in ‘White’ Sororities,” in Changing Cultures from Within: Communication and Asian American Women, edited by Elizabeth Kunimoto. She is currently coediting, The Greenwood Encyclopedia of Asian American Issues Today, with Wendy Ng and Peter Chua.

  • Kenneth I. Clarke Sr., M.Div., D.D.

    Kenneth I. Clarke Sr. is director of Cornell United Religious Work. Prior to coming to Cornell in July 2001, Reverend Clarke was director of the Center for Ethics and Religious Affairs at the Pennsylvania State University (1997–2001). He was the Center’s assistant director from 1990 to 1996 and acting director in 1996–97. Ken also served as an instructor in African/African American studies at Penn State from 1992 to 2001. From 1987 to 1990 Reverend Clarke worked for the Third Baptist Church of San Francisco, initially for the church’s Ethiopian Refugee Resettlement Project and later as assistant pastor/administrator. A native of Baltimore, Maryland, Ken earned a B.A. in English from Morgan State University, a master of divinity degree from Colgate Rochester Divinity School and is currently enrolled in the Doctor of Ministry Program of United Theological Seminary, Dayton, Ohio. A member of the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., he serves as chaplain of the Iota Iota Lambda Chapter in Ithaca. Ken and his wife, Yolanda, assistant dean in the College of Arts and Sciences, co-pastored the Albright Bethune United Methodist Church in State College, Pennsylvania, from 1996 to 2001. They are the parents of Fatima Rose and Ken Jr.

  • Robin Means Coleman, Ph.D.

    Robin Means Coleman is an associate professor of communication studies and Afro American and African Studies. She is the author of African-American Viewers and the Black Situation Comedy: Situating Racial Humor. She is the editor of Say It Loud! African American Audiences, Media, and Identity, and co-editor of Fight the Power! The Spike Lee Reader. Professor Coleman’s additional, selected publications include articles in Television and New Media, Popular Communication, Journal of Black Studies, Journal of Popular Film and Television, and Qualitative Research Reports in Communication. She is currently researching the globalization of black popular culture and how it works to redefine notions of a black diaspora. Her research and commentary has been featured in a variety of media outlets. Coleman is the recipient of the Teaching Excellence award (NYU) and of the Chatham College Alumnae “Cornerstone” Award. She holds life memberships in the National Communication Association, the (p.323) Association for the Study of African American Life and History, the NAACP, and the Eastern Communication Association. She is a member of the National Council of Negro Women and of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc.

  • T. Elon Dancy Ii, Ph.D.

    T. Elon Dancy II received a Ph.D. in higher education administration at Louisiana State University in Baton Rouge. He has written refereed articles, book chapters, and other scholarly publications that interrogate the sociology of education. Dr. Dancy’s research agenda investigates the intersection of race, gender, and culture in colleges and universities. More specifically, his scholarship addresses African American males in schools and colleges as well as the identity constructions, pipeline issues, and environmental norms that influence, improve, and contest these groups’ retention, persistence, experiences, and socio-cognitive outcomes. Dr. Dancy’s work reflects commitment to impacting collegiate issues of access, equity, social justice, and culturally relevant pedagogy. In November 2006, Dancy was named the Emerging Scholar by the Association for the Study of Higher Education Council on Ethnic Participation. Dr. Dancy is presently visiting assistant professor of higher education at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock.

  • Marybeth Gasman, Ph.D.

    After ten years in college and university administration, Marybeth Gasman received a Ph.D. in higher education from Indiana University in 2000. She came to the University of Pennsylvania as an assistant professor in 2003. In 2006, she received the Association for the Study of Higher Education’s Promising Scholar/Early Career Award. Dr. Gasman is a historian of higher education. Her work explores issues pertaining to philanthropy and historically black colleges, black leadership, contemporary fundraising issues at black colleges, and African American giving. Dr. Gasman’s most recent book is Envisioning Black Colleges: A History of the United Negro College Fund. She has also written (with Patrick J. Gilpin) Charles S. Johnson: Leadership beyond the Veil in the Age of Jim Crow), (with Sibby Anderson-Thompkins) Supporting Alma Mater: Successful Strategies for Securing Funds from Black College Alumni, and (with Katherine Sedgwick) Uplifting a People: African American Philanthropy and Education. In addition to these works, Dr. Gasman is the editor (with Benjamin Baez and Caroline Sotello Turner) of Understanding Minority Serving Institutions and Historically Black Colleges and Universities: Triumphs, Troubles, and Taboos with Christopher Tudico.

  • Dara Aquila Govan, J.D.

    Dara Aquila Govan is an attorney at Riker, Danzig, Scherer, Hyland & Perretti, LLP, in the commercial litigation group, where she concentrates her practice in a (p.324) wide range of commercial, litigation, and financial service matters and business disputes. She practices in both state and federal courts in New Jersey and New York. Govan is a 2001 graduate of Rutgers University School of Law–Newark, where she was an associate editor of the Rutgers Law Review. She is the author of “Hazing Out the Membership Intake Process: Addressing Hazing Liability While Preserving the Pledge Process,” Rutgers Law Review. She received several awards at Rutgers, including the Myron Harkavy Prize for the student showing the most promise as a trial lawyer and the Alumni Senior Prize for the student exhibiting the greatest achievement during her entire law school career and who has the greatest promise as a future member of the legal profession. Govan is 1998 graduate of Morgan State University, where she received the President’s Second Mile Award and was initiated into the Alpha Delta Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. Currently, she serves on many boards and continues to be an active member of the sorority.

  • Marcia D. Hernandez, Ph.D.

    Marcia Hernandez earned her doctorate in sociology in 2007 from the State University of New York-University of Albany. She is an assistant professor in the sociology department at the University of the Pacific. Dr. Hernandez’s primary areas of research are gendered racism, colorism, and class as these issues impact the individual and group experiences of sorority members. In addition she is beginning research exploring the professional networking and mentoring opportunities within black sororities.

  • Yolanda Y. Johnson, Ph.D. Candidate

    Yolanda Y. Johnson is a Ph.D. student in sociology at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln. She graduated from Augusta State University with a B.A. in sociology in 2001. She earned her master’s degree in 2003. Her primary research interests are race and ethnicity, crime and deviance, and sociology of education.

  • Fred C. Mccall, M.A.

    Fred McCall is the coordinator in the Office of Greek Life at the University of South Florida. In this position he directly advises National Pan-Hellenic Council, National Pan-Hellenic Conference, and the Unified Greek Council (Multicultural). Fred is a proud member of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc. Fred attended undergraduate at Bowling Green State University and earned his master’s degree at the University of Tennessee in college student personnel. Some of Fred’s research interests include black student success, retention, diversity in higher education, and fraternities and sororities. Fred completed a master’s thesis on the experiences of historically black and traditionally Latino fraternity and sorority members. Fred is passionate about the development of college students and particularly impacting the lives of students in the Greek (p.325) community. Fred has presented at national conferences such as NASPA, ACPA, and NASAP and assisted in facilitating NIC’s Impact and UIFI experiences.

  • Stephanie M. Mcclure, Ph.D.

    Stephanie M. McClure graduated from the University of Missouri in Columbia with a degree in broadcast journalism and a minor in black studies. At the University of Georgia, she completed a master’s and doctoral degree in sociology, with an emphasis in stratification. Dr. McClure’s primary research interests center on social stratification and understanding, predicting, and improving college student success post-entrance. This has led her to conduct research on quite various topics, including voluntary association membership, student engagement in and out of the classroom, and academic advising systems, some of which has been published in, among others, the Journal of Higher Education and the Journal of African American Studies. She is now an assistant professor of sociology at Georgia College & State University.

  • Shanette C. Porter, Ph.D. Candidate

    Shanette C. Porter earned a B.A. in psychology from Yale University and an M.A. in industrial-organizational psychology from Michigan State University. She is currently working on her Ph.D. in social psychology at Cornell University, with a research focus in social cognition, and more specifically, goals, attitudes, and intergroup processes. She has collaborated with multiple authors on topics ranging from automatic attitudes to linguistic influences on diverse teams. In addition, she has taught a course on social cognition and given guest lectures on stereotyping, as well as music in the psychology literatures. She has been a member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc., since 2003.

  • Dwayne J. Scott, Ed.D.

    Dwayne J. Scott is the associate dean of students for Judicial and Ethical Programs at the University of Memphis. Dwayne’s primary role as associate dean involves establishing guidelines for the student code of conduct and enforcing the universities social behavioral policies. Dr. Scott has more than eighteen years of experience in higher education in the student service areas of recruitment, minority student retention, Greek and judicial affairs, as well as an at-risk youth program. He first began researching the phenomenon of hazing among black Greek-letter organizations in 1999, as a research project for a higher education course. It was at the conclusion of his research that he decided to devote more time for an in-depth investigation into the phenomenon of hazing among black Greek-letter fraternities. In particular, Dwayne was interested in hearing from individuals who were personally involved in the aspects of hazing, as candidates for membership and/or chapter members of a black Greek-letter fraternity. Subsequently, the need to know why, led Dwayne to conduct (p.326) his research on contributory factors of hazing among NPHC fraternities as his dissertation topic. He is a member of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc.

  • Terrell L. Strayhorn, Ph.D.

    Terrell L. Strayhorn is an assistant professor of higher education and special assistant to the provost at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, where he also serves as adjunct assistant professor of sociology. In addition, Professor Strayhorn serves as associate director of publications for the Center for African American Research and Policy. His research program centers on the condition of education for historically underrepresented groups, including students, faculty, and professional staff, with a particular accent on issues of access, retention, and how factors coalesce over time to affect success. Member of four editorial boards, Dr. Strayhorn’s work has been accepted for publication in highly regarded peer-reviewed sources including the Journal of Higher Education, Journal of College Student Development, NASPA Journal, Journal of College Student Retention, Community College Journal of Research & Practice, to name a few. He earned a bachelor’s degree in music, a bachelor’s degree in religious studies, and master’s (M.Ed.) in educational policy from the University of Virginia; he earned a Ph.D. in higher education from Virginia Tech. He is a member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Incorporated.

  • Natalie T. J. Tindall, Ph.D.

    Natalie T. J. Tindall is an assistant professor in the Department of Communication at Georgia State University. Her research interests include media diversity and representations, identity and power in media professions, fundraising, and health communication. She is a member of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc.

Chapter Commentators

  • Kira Hudson Banks, Ph.D., L.C.P.

    Kira Hudson Banks is an assistant professor of psychology at Illinois Wesleyan University. Her research and teaching interests focus on the experience of discrimination, mental health, racial identity, and intergroup relations.

  • Martia J. N. H. Brawner, M.Ed.

    Martia J. N. H. Brawner is an assistant dean at Purdue University, advisor of the National Pan-Hellenic Council, advisor of the Multicultural Greek Council, and Region III director of the Association of Fraternity Advisors.

  • (p.327) Elizabeth C. Fine, Ph.D.

    Elizabeth C. Fine is professor and director of the Humanities Program in the Department of Interdisciplinary Studies at Virginia Tech. She served as the first chair of the Department of Interdisciplinary Studies from 2003 to 2007. Her research interests include cultural studies, African American folklore, performance studies, and Appalachian studies. She is the author of Soulstepping: African American Step Shows, Performance, Culture, and Identity, coedited with Jean Haskell Speer, and The Folklore Text: From Performance to Print.

  • Derek Fordjour

    Derek Fordjour is an artist and filmmaker. He produced the documentary Black Sorority Project: The Exodus and is a partner in Brooklyn-based Derek & Jamar Productions. He lives in New York with his family.

  • Michael V. W. Gordon, Ed.D.

    Dr. Gordon is professor emeritus at Indiana University–Bloomington, former vice chancellor/dean of students at Indiana University–Bloomington, and served as the first executive director of the National Pan-Hellenic Council. He has written and spoken widely about hazing in fraternities and sororities.

  • Marc Lamont Hill, Ph.D.

    Marc Lamont Hill is associate professor of education at Teachers College, Columbia University. He is also a faculty member in African American Studies at Columbia University. His research focuses on the intersections between youth, identity, and educational processes. He is the author Beats, Rhymes, and Classroom Life: Hip-Hop Pedagogy and the Politics of Identity.

  • Sherry L. Martin, Ph.D.

    Sherry L. Martin is an assistant professor jointly appointed in the Department of Government and the Program in Feminist, Gender and Sexuality Studies at Cornell University. She is interested in public opinion and mass participation in politics, identity politics, and gender and politics in Japan and the United States.

  • Roland Mitchell, Ph.D.

    Dr. Roland Mitchell is an assistant professor of higher education administration at Louisiana State University where he teaches courses that focus on the history of higher education and college teaching. He has a B.A. in history from Fisk University, an M.Ed. in higher education from Vanderbilt University, and a Ph.D. in educational research from the University of Alabama. His current research interests include theorizing the impact of historical and communal knowledge on pedagogy, and an exploration of the understandings that allow educators to provide service to students from diverse cultural, ethnic, and social backgrounds.

  • (p.328) Caryn E. Neumann, Ph.D.

    Dr. Neumann is a visiting assistant professor of history at Miami University of Ohio. She specializes in African American and women’s history and has published several essays on African American sororities.

  • Rochelle Parks-Yancy, Ph.D.

    Dr. Parks-Yancy is an assistant professor of management at the Jesse H. Jones School of Business at Texas Southern University. She earned her doctorate in organization management from Rutgers University. Her teaching expertise is in human resources and organizational behavior and her research examines social capital and its relationship to the careers of diverse social groups, as well as to organizational hiring and promotion processes.

  • Laura Morgan Roberts, Ph.D.

    Laura Morgan Roberts is an assistant professor of organizational behavior at the Harvard Business School. Her research and teaching interests center on the construction and maintenance of positive identities in work organizations, with a special emphasis on the connections between diversity and authenticity.

  • Cynthia Lynne Shelton, Ph.D.

    Cynthia Lynne Shelton is assistant professor and director of Africana studies at Kentucky State University. Dr. Shelton also serves as director of the Kentucky Institute for International Studies program in Brazil. Her research interests include the impact of women’s organizations on the international social justice movement.

  • Shuana K. Tucker, Ph.D.

    Shuana K. Tucker is an assistant professor of educational leadership at the University of Connecticut. Her research interests include African American organizations, African American women leaders, urban education, and urban leaders.

  • Corey D. B. Walker, Ph.D.

    Corey D. B. Walker is associate professor in the Department of Africana Studies at Brown University where he teaches courses in philosophy, critical theory, modern theology, and religion in public life. He is author of A Noble Fight: African American Freemasonry and the Struggle for Democracy in America and the forthcoming Between Transcendence and History: An Essay on Religion and the Future of Democracy.

  • (p.329) Lynn Perry Wooten, Ph.D.

    Lynn Perry Wooten is a clinical associate professor of strategy, management, and organizations in the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan. She also co-directs the Center for Positive Organizational Scholarship. Her research interests include diversity management, crisis leadership, positive organizational scholarship, and qualitative methods in organizational studies.

About the Editors

  • Matthew W. Hughey, Ph.D.

    Dr. Matthew W. Hughey earned his B.A. from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro (sociology), a M.Ed. from Ohio University (cultural studies), and his Ph.D. from the University of Virginia (sociology). During his last year at the University of Virginia, he was awarded the prestigious Z Society Distinguished Faculty Award and was the recipient of the 2009 James E. Blackwell Distinguished Paper Award from the American Sociological Association Section on Racial & Ethnic Minorities. He now works as an assistant professor of sociology at Mississippi State University. As a relatively young scholar, Dr. Hughey has already established his name as a significant “up and comer” in the study of racial identity, raced organizations, and racial media representations. His work has appeared in top scholastic journals such as Ethnic & Racial Studies; Social Problems; Symbolic Interaction; The Journal of Contemporary Ethnography; Critical Sociology; Sociology Compass; Race, Ethnicity & Education; Humanity & Society; and the Journal of African American Studies. Dr. Hughey is chair of the Racial and Ethnic Studies Division of the Cultural Studies Association and has been an active member of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc., since the fall of 1996. He is coeditor, with Dr. Gregory Parks, of The Obamas and a (Post) Racial America? and 12 Angry Men: True Stories of Being a Black Man in America Today.

  • Gregory S. Parks, Ph.D., J.D.

    Dr. Gregory S. Parks has quickly established a name for himself as a preeminent BGLO scholar. He earned his B.S. from Howard University, his M.S. from the City University of New York (forensic psychology), and his Ph.D. from the University of Kentucky (clinical psychology). He is currently a third-year law student at Cornell University. Dr. Parks is coeditor of one text on BGLOs (African American Fraternities and Sororities: The Legacy and the Vision), and is the sole editor of another book based on BGLO culture (Our Fight Has Just Begun: The Relevance of Black Fraternities and Sororities in the Twenty-first Century), and is a coeditor of Critical Race Realism: Intersections of Psychology, Race and Law. He is also a life member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.

    (p.330) Together, Drs. Hughey and Parks have been coauthors and editors for various academic, higher education, and layman journals (Diverse Issues in Higher Education, Black Enterprise, Ebony, Essentials: A Publication for Members of the Association of Fraternity Advisors, and AURORA: The Official Organ of Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc.) in order to drum up interest for the scholarly illumination of BGLOs’ culture, contributions, and contradictions. They have also spoke and lectured at various academic and professional conferences around the United States on the import of BGLOs and the necessity of bringing more scholarly attention to them.