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All Stories Are TrueHistory, Myth, and Trauma in the Work of John Edgar Wideman$
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Tracie Church Guzzio

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9781617030048

Published to University Press of Mississippi: March 2014

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781617030048.001.0001

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date: 15 December 2017

Truth and Reconciliation

Truth and Reconciliation

The Blues and The Heroic Romance

Chapter:
(p.190) Chapter Five Truth and Reconciliation
Source:
All Stories Are True
Author(s):

Tracie Church Guzzio

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781617030048.003.0006

This chapter discusses the changes in Wideman’s later works, which now encompass areas beyond his immediate family and their history. The arc of his latest works has shifted to American history, to Africa, and to Martinique. It could be argued that Wideman’s later novels merely reflect the times, but the relationship between the world outside the doorstep and the world inside one’s own home has always been a factor in his novels and nonfiction. Since the publication of The Cattle Killing, Wideman’s writing not only has emphasized the importance of sharing stories in addressing the wounds of the past, but has also introduced love, intimacy, and trust as fundamental to soothing the chronic, feverish plagues ready to engulf the planet.

Keywords:   immediate family, American history, Africa, Martinique, sharing stories

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