Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
A Decade of Dark HumorHow Comedy, Irony, and Satire Shaped Post-9/11 America$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Ted Gournelos and Viveca Greene

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9781617030062

Published to University Press of Mississippi: March 2014

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781617030062.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of
date: 16 December 2017

Everything Changes Forever (Temporarily)

Everything Changes Forever (Temporarily)

Late-Night Television Comedy after 9/11

Chapter:
(p.3) Chapter One Everything Changes Forever (Temporarily)
Source:
A Decade of Dark Humor
Author(s):

David Gurney

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781617030062.003.0001

This chapter examines late-night television comedy programs and the reasons why the format largely failed to address the complexity of 9/11, either at all or with humor. It first considers the comedic practices of late-night talk show hosts such as Bill Maher, and the discursive formation they constituted before, during, and immediately after the 9/11 attacks. It then discusses the comedians’ reactions to the events and the call to approach news topics more “seriously.” It also assesses the long-term (non)effects of the 9/11 attacks on late-night talk show humor to determine the adaptability and resilience of this form of mediated political comedy. The chapter concludes by arguing that late-night television comedy, despite becoming a more pluralistic space that allows potentially divisive opinions to enter broader public discourse, may also become a venue for external forces to police that space.

Keywords:   late-night television, comedy programs, 9/11, humor, Bill Maher, comedians, news, political comedy

University Press of Mississippi requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.