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Faulkner and Whiteness$
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Jay Watson

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9781617030208

Published to University Press of Mississippi: March 2014

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781617030208.001.0001

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date: 11 December 2017

Inside and Outside Southern Whiteness

Inside and Outside Southern Whiteness

Film Viewing, the Frame, and the Racing of Space in Yoknapatawpha

Chapter:
(p.147) Inside and Outside Southern Whiteness
Source:
Faulkner and Whiteness
Author(s):

Peter Lurie

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781617030208.003.0007

This chapter explores how the act of cinema-going in the racially organized and coded space of the southern Jim Crow movie house worked to construct and consolidate a white racial identity for economically and/or spatially peripheral whites sampling the new goods, services, and pleasures available in modernizing, urbanizing environments. Drawing on recent scholarship on the social history of film viewership in the segregation-era South, it looks at the connections between white film spectatorship and the racializing activity of “consuming” racial violence in the form of spectacle lynching. The chapter examines these connections in William Faulkner’s fictions such as “Dry September” and Light in August in the context of viewership that is simultaneously inside and outside the operation of normative whiteness in Yoknapatawpha.

Keywords:   racial identity, whites, film viewership, South, racial violence, spectacle, William Faulkner, Light in August, whiteness, Yoknapatawpha

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