Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Faulkner and Whiteness$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Jay Watson

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9781617030208

Published to University Press of Mississippi: March 2014

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781617030208.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of
date: 11 December 2017

White Disavowal, Black Enfranchisement, and the Homoerotic in William Faulkner’s Light in August

White Disavowal, Black Enfranchisement, and the Homoerotic in William Faulkner’s Light in August

Chapter:
(p.170) White Disavowal, Black Enfranchisement, and the Homoerotic in William Faulkner’s Light in August
Source:
Faulkner and Whiteness
Author(s):

Aliyyah I. Abdur-Rahman

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781617030208.003.0008

This chapter explores whiteness as a racial formation in William Faulkner’s novel Light in August in the context of the post-Reconstruction period in the South. It looks at the postbellum enfranchisement of African American men and how racial blackness underwent a cultural miscegenation by acquiring some of the rights and properties of white manhood, resulting in a crisis of confidence for white masculinity. The chapter argues that the main protagonist in Light in August, Joe Christmas, represents Faulkner’s meditation on the civic equality of black men during the period and its effect on the psyche of white men. It also considers the threat posed by all black men to the racial order after they had been given the vote and the legal position as head of their families, and how this threat relates to homoeroticism.

Keywords:   whiteness, William Faulkner, Light in August, post-Reconstruction period, South, enfranchisement, blackness, black men, white men, homoeroticism

University Press of Mississippi requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.