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The Florida Folklife Reader$
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Tina Bucuvalas

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9781617031403

Published to University Press of Mississippi: March 2014

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781617031403.001.0001

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date: 22 October 2017

Legacy and Meaning in the Changing Sacred Harp Tradition of the Okefenokee Region

Legacy and Meaning in the Changing Sacred Harp Tradition of the Okefenokee Region

Chapter:
(p.178) Legacy and Meaning in the Changing Sacred Harp Tradition of the Okefenokee Region
Source:
The Florida Folklife Reader
Author(s):

Laurie K. Sommers

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781617031403.003.0012

In 1958, a small group of Sacred Harp singers from Hoboken, Georgia, attended the Florida Folk Festival in the north-central Florida community of White Springs. Led by school teacher Silas Lee, the singers, who came all the way from the Okefenokee region of southeast Georgia and northeast Florida, performed three songs from the B. F. White Sacred Harp, Revised Cooper Edition. Sacred Harp is a musical tradition which, along with Primitive Baptist hymnody, has been a defining genre for the Okefenokee region. This chapter explores legacy and meaning in the changing Sacred Harp tradition of the Okefenokee region. It looks at Crawfordite hymnody and its place in a larger tradition of unaccompanied congregational singing among Primitive Baptists. The chapter also provides a background on the Sacred Harp singers of south Georgia and north Florida.

Keywords:   hymnody, Sacred Harp, singers, Florida Folk Festival, Silas Lee, Okefenokee region, Georgia, Florida, congregational singing, Primitive Baptists

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