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Black Power, Yellow Power, and the Making of Revolutionary Identities$
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Rychetta Watkins

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9781617031618

Published to University Press of Mississippi: March 2014

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781617031618.001.0001

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date: 22 October 2018

Reading Resistance

Reading Resistance

The Guerilla in Literature

Chapter:
(p.114) Chapter Four Reading Resistance
Source:
Black Power, Yellow Power, and the Making of Revolutionary Identities
Author(s):

Rychetta Watkins

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781617031618.003.0005

This chapter applies the different facets of guerilla subjectivity—resistant, anticolonial, self-defined, self-determined, ideologically grounded, revolutionary agent—to a reading of Sam Greenlee’s The Spook Who Sat by the Door (1969; 1990), Alice Walker’s Meridian (1976), and John Okada’s No-No Boy (1957; 1976). Greenlee’s novel is considered as an example of a stereotypical militant, revolutionary subjectivity. The novels by Walker and Okada are used to examine how these literary representations of the guerilla synthesize politics and aesthetics in a textual subject that complicates representations of blackness and yellowness, as well as revolution and resistance.

Keywords:   guerilla, politics, aesthetics, blackness, yellowness, Sam Greenlee, The Spook Who Sat by the Door, Alice Walker, Meridian, John Okada, No-No Boy

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