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Borders of EqualityThe NAACP and the Baltimore Civil Rights Struggle, 1914-1970$
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Lee Sartain

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9781617037511

Published to University Press of Mississippi: March 2014

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781617037511.001.0001

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date: 17 December 2018

Leadership and Dr. Lillie M. Jackson

Leadership and Dr. Lillie M. Jackson

Chapter:
(p.76) Chapter Three Leadership and Dr. Lillie M. Jackson
Source:
Borders of Equality
Author(s):

Lee Sartain

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781617037511.003.0004

Lillie May Jackson assumed the presidency of the NAACP’s Baltimore branch in 1935 and served in that capacity until January 1970, a period that spanned the New Deal and the end of the civil rights movement. Her long tenure was exceptional, made possible by her charismatic and dominating personality and by creating an organization of familial and social networks that defined civil rights in Baltimore for almost forty years. This chapter examines Jackson and her family’s dominance of the NAACP’s Baltimore branch from the early 1930s, as well as the philosophical and tactical approaches to civil rights that were employed during her presidency. It looks at criticisms hurled against Jackson during her tenure as president, both from the Baltimore community and the national NAACP. The chapter also reevaluates the concept that women were simply background workers in early civil rights activities, reassesses ideas of civil rights leadership, and analyzes why some women could become “traditional” leaders.

Keywords:   civil rights movement, NAACP, Baltimore, civil rights, Lillie M. Jackson, women, leadership

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