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Shocking the ConscienceA Reporter's Account of the Civil Rights Movement$
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Simeon Booker and Carol McCabe Booker

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9781617037894

Published to University Press of Mississippi: March 2014

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781617037894.001.0001

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date: 15 December 2017

The Rally Ends; The Killing Begins

The Rally Ends; The Killing Begins

Chapter:
(p.18) 3 The Rally Ends; The Killing Begins
Source:
Shocking the Conscience
Author(s):

Simeon Booker

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781617037894.003.0003

This chapter discusses the murder of the Reverend George Washington Lee, a prominent civil rights leader from Belzoni, Mississippi. Lee was one of the speakers at the voting rights rally that took place in the Mississippi Delta town of Mound Bayou in April 1955. He was shot on May 8, 1955, probably by racists who were outraged over his speech in Mound Bayou. Even while the Federal Bureau of Investigation was probing Lee’s murder, seven other Mississippi Negro leaders reportedly had been marked for death by white supremacists: Dr. T. R. M. Howard, state NAACP president Dr. A. H. McCoy, NAACP state secretary Medgar Evers, former NAACP state president Dr. James Stringer, civil rights activist Dr. Clinton Battle, undertaker T. V. Johnson, and grocer Gus Courts. All of these men had been vocal about their support for immediate integration of public schools and had been involved in voter registration drives.

Keywords:   murder, George Washington Lee, civil rights, Mississippi, voting rights, rally, Mound Bayou, Federal Bureau of Investigation, T. R. M. Howard, NAACP

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