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Rethinking the Irish in the American SouthBeyond Rounders and Reelers$
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Bryan Albin Giemza

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9781617037986

Published to University Press of Mississippi: March 2014

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781617037986.001.0001

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date: 16 December 2017

After Strange Kin

After Strange Kin

Further Reflections on the Relations between Ireland and the American South

Chapter:
(p.36) Chapter 2 After Strange Kin
Source:
Rethinking the Irish in the American South
Author(s):

Kieran Quinlan

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781617037986.003.0003

This chapter discusses the complexity of the immigrant population from Ireland in terms of denominational affiliation and social status and calls for reconsideration of the Irish (mainly Catholics from the “south” of Ireland) and Scotch-Irish (mainly Ulster Protestants of Scottish ancestry) distinction. Since this was a distinction that originated within Ireland itself, its replication in the southern colonies and states ought to have been no surprise at all and to have made the need for comparison and contrast between Ireland and the American South all the more obviously a subject for scholarly investigation.

Keywords:   Irish, immigrant population, social status, affiliation, Scotch-Irish

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