Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Race and the Obama PhenomenonThe Vision of a More Perfect Multiracial Union$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

G. Reginald Daniel and Hettie V. Williams

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9781628460216

Published to University Press of Mississippi: May 2015

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781628460216.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of
date: 15 December 2018

Barack Obama’s White Appeal and the Perverse Racial Politics of the Post–Civil Rights Era

Barack Obama’s White Appeal and the Perverse Racial Politics of the Post–Civil Rights Era

Chapter:
(p.287) 14. Barack Obama’s White Appeal and the Perverse Racial Politics of the Post–Civil Rights Era
Source:
Race and the Obama Phenomenon
Author(s):

Paul Street

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781628460216.003.0014

This chapter argues that it is historically significant that droves of whites are willing to embrace a black presidential candidate. Indeed, forty years ago, it would have been impossible for a black politician to become a viable presidential contender as the United States entered the racially turbulent summer of 1967 and the movie Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner disturbed conventional racial norms by portraying a black doctor (played by Sidney Poitier) dating a white woman (Joanna Drayton). Nothing black candidates could have done or said would have prevented them from being excluded on the basis of the color of their skin. The fact that this is no longer true is a sign of some (admittedly slow) racial progress more than fifty years after the Civil Rights and Voting Rights Acts. But this chapter maintains that there are various reasons not to become overly excited about Obama’s cross-racial appeal from a racial justice perspective.

Keywords:   Race, Barack Obama, Postracial, Post-Civil Rights Era, Whiteness

University Press of Mississippi requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.