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Gone to the GraveBurial Customs of the Arkansas Ozarks, 1850-1950$
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Abby Burnett

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9781628461114

Published to University Press of Mississippi: May 2015

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781628461114.001.0001

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date: 18 December 2017

Conclusion

Conclusion

Walking the Buckeye Log

Chapter:
(p.257) Conclusion
Source:
Gone to the Grave
Author(s):

Abby Burnett

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781628461114.003.0013

The role played by the fraternal lodges (Masons, Odd Fellows, Woodmen of the World, etc.) is described, as many of these organizations had, as part of their creeds, burial of the dead and aiding widows and orphans. To this end, many lodges established widows’ homes and orphanages and set up burial insurance plans for members. African Americans, denied access to whites’ hospitals and burial insurance, founded fraternal lodges to provide these services to members. Many of these organizations, founded in Arkansas, flourished outside the state until the Depression. This chapter discusses some of the many ways life has changed since the days when the dead were buried by members of their community.

Keywords:   Masons, Odd Fellows, Woodmen of the World, Orphanages, African American lodges

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