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Gone to the GraveBurial Customs of the Arkansas Ozarks, 1850-1950$
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Abby Burnett

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9781628461114

Published to University Press of Mississippi: May 2015

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781628461114.001.0001

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date: 18 December 2017

Notification, Transportation, and Farewell

Notification, Transportation, and Farewell

Chapter:
(p.107) Chapter Six Notification, Transportation, and Farewell
Source:
Gone to the Grave
Author(s):

Abby Burnett

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781628461114.003.0006

Notifying the community that a burial was to take place was challenging in communities having only a weekly newspaper. A variety of means were employed: bells, party-line phones, word of mouth, handmade funeral notices. Obituaries, often published long after the burial, contained a wealth of information not found today, including the deceased’s last words and cause of death. Coffins were carried to the cemetery, or transported there in the back of a wagon, truck or later, in funeral home hearses. Prior to closing the coffin it was customary for mourners to take a final, farewell look at the deceased. There was no societal taboo against this, the touching of remains, or viewing any that were deteriorated.

Keywords:   Funeral notices, Obituaries, Last words, Cause of death, Hearses

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