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Southern Ladies and SuffragistsJulia Ward Howe and Women's Rights at the 1884 New Orleans World's Fair$
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Miki Pfeffer

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9781628461343

Published to University Press of Mississippi: May 2017

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781628461343.001.0001

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date: 11 December 2018

An Immense Responsibility

An Immense Responsibility

Chapter:
(p.39) Three An Immense Responsibility
Source:
Southern Ladies and Suffragists
Author(s):

Miki Pfeffer

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781628461343.003.0004

This chapter first describes how impoverished women in New Orleans and elsewhere looked to the Cotton Centennial Exposition as a potential employer. Many of these women carried the “immense responsibility” of helping support their families. However, most were disappointed when they did not land a job. The Exposition expected to hire approximately fifty clerks at fifty dollars a month, a handsome salary, but the weekly tabloid Mascot contended that positions were going to friends of the heads of departments rather than to those who needed work and had the right skills. The remainder of the chapter describes Julia Ward Howe's tendency to rankle.

Keywords:   poor women, employment, Woman's Department, World's Industrial and Cotton Centennial Exposition, New Orleans, Julia Ward Howe

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