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Southern Ladies and SuffragistsJulia Ward Howe and Women's Rights at the 1884 New Orleans World's Fair$
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Miki Pfeffer

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9781628461343

Published to University Press of Mississippi: May 2017

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781628461343.001.0001

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date: 22 October 2018

Endings

Endings

Chapter:
(p.200) Seventeen Endings
Source:
Southern Ladies and Suffragists
Author(s):

Miki Pfeffer

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781628461343.003.0018

This chapter focuses on events surrounding the end of the Cotton Centennial Exposition, in particular the Woman's Day celebration on May 30, 1885. Although it was Maud Howe's time to shine because the event centered on her gift of books, her mother presided at the occasion. Grace King noted, she did so “as a matter of course. She presides at everything & has done it so long that her air, manner, smile & language are actually thread bare,” King gossiped to her sister May. King and other local women had long ago tired of Howe's intruder personality, but she had delivered useful messages and employed effective tactics to make a successful Woman's Department.

Keywords:   Woman's Department, World's Industrial and Cotton Centennial Exposition, New Orleans, Woman's Day, Julia Ward Howe, Maud Howe, Grace King

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