Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Joker
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

The Joker: A Serious Study of the Clown Prince of Crime

Robert Moses Peaslee and Robert G. Weiner

Abstract

Along with Batman, Spider-Man, and Superman, the Joker is one of the most recognizable sequential art characters in popular culture. While there has been a great deal of scholarly attention on superheroes, very little has been done looking at the role of supervillains; The Joker: A Critical Study of the Clown Prince of Crime attempts to fill this gap. It is the first academic work to provide a comprehensive study of this character, asking the question, why, particularly today, is the Joker so relevant to audiences? Scholars from a wide array of disciplines look at the Joker through the lens of ... More

Keywords: The Joker, Batman, Comic Studies, Supervillains, Graphic Narrative, Game Studies, Television and Film Studies

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2015 Print ISBN-13: 9781628462388
Published to University Press of Mississippi: May 2016 DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781628462388.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Robert Moses Peaslee, editor
Peaslee and Weiner: Texas Tech University

Robert G. Weiner, editor

Show Summary Details

subscribe or login to access all content.

Contents

View:

I The Changeable Trickster

Shifting Makeups

Dan Hassoun

Lady Haha

Eric Garneau

Episodes of Madness

David Ray Carter

II The Joker and the Political

The Obama-Joker

Emmanuelle Wessels and Mark Martinez

Kiss with a Fist

Tosha Taylor

More Than the Hood Was Red

Richard D. Heldenfels

III The Digital Joker

Playing (with) the Villain

Kristin M. S. Bezio

“Why So Serious?”

Kim Owczarski

IV Joker Theory

The Joker Plays the King

Hannah Means-Shannon

Making Sense Squared

Mark P. Williams

“You Complete Me”

Michael Goodrum

Afterword

Will Brooker

End Matter