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Beyond WindrushRethinking Postwar Anglophone Caribbean Literature$
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J. Dillon Brown and Leah Reade Rosenberg

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781628464757

Published to University Press of Mississippi: January 2017

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781628464757.001.0001

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date: 12 November 2018

Rescripting Anglophone Caribbean Women’s Literary History: Gender, Genre, and Lost Caribbean Voices

Rescripting Anglophone Caribbean Women’s Literary History: Gender, Genre, and Lost Caribbean Voices

Chapter:
(p.79) Rescripting Anglophone Caribbean Women’s Literary History: Gender, Genre, and Lost Caribbean Voices
Source:
Beyond Windrush
Author(s):

Alison Donnell

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781628464757.003.0005

This chapter explores how English-speaking Caribbean women were active writers in the 1950s and 1960s, particularly visible in Caribbean Voices and Bim, even though they rarely made the transition in genre from short story to novel. It argues that there were a series of factors that explain this: women were less likely to migrate, less likely to conceive of writing as a profession, more likely to have their work classified as folkloric (and thus not real art), and less likely to be assisted with connections to publishing networks (themselves largely dominated by men). The essay thus maintains that a broad spectrum of work by women writers contemporaneous with Windrush has remained hidden in the archives. Positioning itself as an act of critical recovery, the chapter points to the need for a more sustained and systematic effort to unearth this heretofore overlooked lineage and continuity in women’s writing.

Keywords:   Caribbean Voices, Women’s writing, Short story, Genre, Publishing networks

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