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Beyond WindrushRethinking Postwar Anglophone Caribbean Literature$
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J. Dillon Brown and Leah Reade Rosenberg

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781628464757

Published to University Press of Mississippi: January 2017

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781628464757.001.0001

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date: 15 December 2017

Beyond Windrush and the Original Black Atlantic Routes: Austin Clarke, Race, and Canada’s Influence on Anglophone Caribbean Literature

Beyond Windrush and the Original Black Atlantic Routes: Austin Clarke, Race, and Canada’s Influence on Anglophone Caribbean Literature

Chapter:
(p.206) Beyond Windrush and the Original Black Atlantic Routes: Austin Clarke, Race, and Canada’s Influence on Anglophone Caribbean Literature
Source:
Beyond Windrush
Author(s):

Michael A. Bucknor

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781628464757.003.0013

This chapter turns to Canada – long an important migration destination from the Caribbean–as an overlooked site of postwar literary production. Employing the example of the Barbadian-born Austin Clarke, an author firmly canonized and even celebrated in Canada, it explores the generative links Clarke’s own career exemplifies between the Caribbean, Canada, the United States, and Britain–a multifaceted transnationalism in conversation with his Windrush peers but equally influenced by the Civil Rights movement in the U.S. and racial politics in Canada. Employing theories of the Black Atlantic and diaspora, the chapter holds Clarke up as an exemplar of literary and political processes that resist containment within an anti-colonial national frame by gesturing outwards, toward a differentially rooted (and routed), insistently global politics of blackness.

Keywords:   Austin Clarke, Canada, Caribbean-Canadian, Black Atlantic, Transnationalism

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