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Larry Brown and the Blue-Collar South$
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Jean W. Cash and Keith Perry

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9781934110751

Published to University Press of Mississippi: March 2014

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781934110751.001.0001

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date: 17 December 2018

On The Rough South of Larry Brown

On The Rough South of Larry Brown

An Interview with Filmmaker Gary Hawkins

Chapter:
(p.156) (p.157) Afterword On The Rough South of Larry Brown
Source:
Larry Brown and the Blue-Collar South
Author(s):

Katherine Powell

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781934110751.003.0011

This chapter presents the transcript of an interview with independent filmmaker Gary Hawkins, who talks about his award-winning documentary The Rough South of Larry Brown (2002). Conducted in 2003, the Hawkins interview offers a glimpse into Brown’s life and work as well as their north Mississippi milieu. The documentary is the result of film adaptations of Brown’s three short stories: “Boy and Dog,” “Wild Thing,” and “Samaritans.” Hawkins captured sincere and revealing comments from both Larry and his wife Mary Annie Brown, who offered genuine insights into what it was like to be Larry Brown the fiction writer. He premiered The Rough South of Larry Brown at the 2002 Full Frame Documentary Film Festival in Durham, North Carolina, and subsequently entered it into a number of regional film festivals. The documentary won several awards, including an Off-Hollywood Oscar for Best Feature Film at the 2002 Ohio Independent Film Festival, Best Feature at the 2002 Savannah (Georgia) Film and Video Festival, and Best Documentary at the 2003 Oxford (Mississippi) Film Festival. Brown died in November 2004 and was buried at Tula, Mississippi.

Keywords:   interview, Gary Hawkins, documentary, Rough South, Mississippi, film adaptations, short stories, Mary Annie Brown, film festivals, Larry Brown

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