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Disability, Narrative Normativity, and the Stigmatized Vernacular of Communicative (in)Competence

Disability, Narrative Normativity, and the Stigmatized Vernacular of Communicative (in)Competence

Chapter:
(p.23) Chapter One Disability, Narrative Normativity, and the Stigmatized Vernacular of Communicative (in)Competence
Source:
Diagnosing Folklore
Author(s):
Amy Shuman
Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781496804259.003.0002

Amy Shuman starts us off with chapter 1, “Disability, Narrative Normativity, and the Stigmatized Vernacular of Communicative (in)Competence,” which builds on her previous work with Diane E. Goldstein and their shared contention that folklorists can make an important contribution to the study of stigma by devoting particular attention to the process of managing how value is assigned, claimed, and denied in social interactions, rather than focusing on categories of stigmatization. Placing ethnographic practice and folkloristic theories of communicative competence in conversation with the works of disability studies, anthropology, and sociolinguistics, Shuman endeavors to demonstrate how normativity stigmatizes individuals, especially those with intellectual disabilities (ID), and underscores the need for multiple normalcies.

Keywords:   Normativity, Stigmatized Vernacular, Communicative Competence, Normalcy, Intellectual Disabilities

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