Page of

Agency, Reciprocal Engagement, and Applied Folklore Practice: Beyond the Smithsonian Folklife Festival

Agency, Reciprocal Engagement, and Applied Folklore Practice: Beyond the Smithsonian Folklife Festival

Chapter:
(p.275) Agency, Reciprocal Engagement, and Applied Folklore Practice: Beyond the Smithsonian Folklife Festival
Source:
Curatorial Conversations
Author(s):
Diana Baird N’Diaye
Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781496805980.003.0015

This chapter focuses on the participatory research projects African Immigrant Folklife and Will to Adorn: African American Style, Community, Identity, which provided fieldwork training that has yielded documentation for the planning of Smithsonian Folklife Festivals and other projects. The author reflects on the applied aspects of public folklore, describing a curatorial approach that prioritizes commitment to community self-determination and building reciprocal research-learning relationships between Smithsonian staff and community-based cultural researchers.

Keywords:   African American Folklife, African immigrant Folklife, Applied Folklore, Public Folklore, Research (collaborative, reciprocal, self-documentation)

Sign In

Copyright © 2020. All rights reserved.
Privacy Policy and Legal Notice