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A Transplanted Musical Practice Flourishing in the African Diaspora

A Transplanted Musical Practice Flourishing in the African Diaspora

Chapter:
(p.188) 6 A Transplanted Musical Practice Flourishing in the African Diaspora
Source:
West African Drumming and Dance in North American Universities
Author(s):
George WorlasiKwasi Dor
Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781617039140.003.0006

Chapter 6 draws on the Ghanaian Ewe conception of “planting a musical genre”—wudodo. So, West African dance drumming is metaphorically a transplanted genre that continues to flourish and “bear fruits,” and its thriving in the American academy depends on factors the chapter explores. Furthermore, Furthermore, Dor argues, these dances draw a remarkable patronage because of the aesthetic pleasure they provide both audiences and student participants. The Ewe metaphor, Detsivivi yehea zikpui (“It is the sumptuous soup that draws the [eater’s] stool” vividly captures this “sweetness” concept of a music genre. Additionally, chapter 6 discusses a) the genre as a university subculture; b) the unflinching following from audiences; c) African American perspectives; d) the English language as a post-colonial imprint that enables or constraints the selection of dances, instructors, and countries in which the genre can be taught; and e) the influence of city/regional demography on the development of university ensembles.

Keywords:   Chapter keywords, Musical genre as a plant, “Sweetness” of music, African American Perspectives, Influence of English Language, Demography and university ensembles

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