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Joe T. Patterson and the White South's DilemmaEvolving Resistance to Black Advancement$
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Robert E., Jr. Luckett

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781496802699

Published to University Press of Mississippi: January 2017

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781496802699.001.0001

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White Paranoia and Black Informants

White Paranoia and Black Informants

Chapter:
(p.70) Chapter 4 White Paranoia and Black Informants
Source:
Joe T. Patterson and the White South's Dilemma
Author(s):

Robert E. Luckett

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781496802699.003.0005

This chapter examines the cases of the Reverend Clennon King and Horace Germany to illustrate the dilemma faced by whites: if they took the law into their own hands, they were opening themselves to increasing scrutiny from the federal government, the press, and the American public. In 1958, King, who taught as a professor of history at historically black Alcorn College outside Lorman, attempted to integrate the graduate school at the University of Mississippi. Germany, a Church of God minister, proposed for the establishment of a training school for black ministers. This chapter first considers Joe T. Patterson's response to the violence perpetrated against Germany before discussing the Sovereignty Commission's public relations campaign, led by Erle Johnston, designed to sell the rest of the country on the racial equity that existed under the state's Jim Crow regime. It also explores the controversy sparked by informant Joe Albright's work inside the civil rights movement on behalf of the Commission.

Keywords:   civil rights movement, Clennon King, Horace Germany, Joe T. Patterson, violence, Mississippi, Sovereignty Commission, public relations, Erle Johnston, Joe Albright

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