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From Daniel Boone to Captain AmericaPlaying Indian in American Popular Culture$
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Chad A. Barbour

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781496806840

Published to University Press of Mississippi: January 2018

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781496806840.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM Mississippi SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mississippi.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Mississippi, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSSO for personal use.date: 30 May 2020

From the Nineteenth to the Twentieth Century

From the Nineteenth to the Twentieth Century

The Frontier Mythos in Comics Adaptations

Chapter:
(p.62) Chapter Three From the Nineteenth to the Twentieth Century
Source:
From Daniel Boone to Captain America
Author(s):

Chad A. Barbour

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781496806840.003.0004

Chapter three follows the lineage of frontier and Western fantasies from the nineteenth century to the twentieth via the comic book adaptations of novels like The Last of the Mohicans and comic depictions of frontier figures like Boone and Girty. Following in the line of late-nineteenth century dime novels and early twentieth century film, comic books inherited many of the tropes and conventions of the Western and frontier genres, including those of the white Indian and playing Indian. Multiple adaptations of The Last of the Mohicans, from the 1940s to the 2000s, testify to that story's persistent appeal. In the 1950s, a flurry of Boone comics demonstrates his popularity as an American hero while engaging in many of the themes and cultural implications that are essential to this book's focus.

Keywords:   comic books, adaptation, playing Indian, the Western, frontier

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