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Dis-Orienting PlanetsRacial Representations of Asia in Science Fiction$
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Isiah Lavender III

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781496811523

Published to University Press of Mississippi: May 2019

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781496811523.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM Mississippi SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mississippi.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Mississippi, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSSO for personal use.date: 21 September 2021

Yellow Perils

Yellow Perils

M. P. Shiel, Race, and the Far East Menace

Chapter:
(p.73) Yellow Perils
Source:
Dis-Orienting Planets
Author(s):

Amy J. Ransom

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781496811523.003.0006

Amy J. Ransom, in “Yellow Perils: M. P. Shiel, Race, and the Far East Menace,” examines Shiel’s three “Yellow Peril” novels—The Yellow Danger (1898), The Yellow Wave (1905), and The Dragon (1913), republished as The Yellow Peril (1929)—in relation to their representations of racial Others. Largely adhering to the future war or secret history sub-genres, Shiel’s three novels—like much of his work—draw on contemporary headlines, such as the opening of Japan to the West in the Meiji period (1868-1945), the Anglo-Japanese Alliance (1902; 1905; 1911), and the Russo-Japanese war (1904-05). By situating Shiel’s work within the larger framework of Yellow peril literature and analyzing how its representations of Asians comply with (and depart from) contemporary discourses on race and degeneracy, Ransom reveals Shiel’s conflicted attitudes about his own multi-racial background.

Keywords:   M.P. Shiel, China and Japan, Yellow Peril, Future war, degeneration

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