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Dis-Orienting PlanetsRacial Representations of Asia in Science Fiction$
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Isiah Lavender III

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781496811523

Published to University Press of Mississippi: May 2019

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781496811523.001.0001

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“Race as Technology” and the Asian Body in The Bohr Maker and Salt Fish Girl

“Race as Technology” and the Asian Body in The Bohr Maker and Salt Fish Girl

Chapter:
(p.117) “Race as Technology” and the Asian Body in The Bohr Maker and Salt Fish Girl
Source:
Dis-Orienting Planets
Author(s):

Malisa Kurtz

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781496811523.003.0009

Malisa Kurtz, in “‘Race as Technology’ and the Asian Body in The Bohr Maker and Salt Fish Girl,” analyzes the relationships among race, biotechnologies, and genomics in Linda Nagata’s The Bohr Maker (1995) and Larissa Lai’s Salt Fish Girl (2002). Asian characters in The Bohr Maker and Salt Fish Girl are differentiated by their genetics rather than visible physical traits, and both novels question how genomic research might lead to the re-emergence of racist assumptions about biological “destiny.” By specifically using techno-Orientalist tropes, both novels reveal the ways in which the bodies of people of color are doubly racialized in science fiction, reduced to instruments of both science and narrative exoticism.

Keywords:   Techno-Orientalism, Race and technology, Biopolitics, Genomics, Post-racial

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