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Dis-Orienting PlanetsRacial Representations of Asia in Science Fiction$
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Isiah Lavender III

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781496811523

Published to University Press of Mississippi: May 2019

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781496811523.001.0001

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Intersubjectivity and Cultural Exchange in Kij Johnson’s Novels of Japan

Intersubjectivity and Cultural Exchange in Kij Johnson’s Novels of Japan

Chapter:
(p.244) Intersubjectivity and Cultural Exchange in Kij Johnson’s Novels of Japan
Source:
Dis-Orienting Planets
Author(s):

Joan Gordon

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781496811523.003.0018

Joan Gordon’s “Intersubjectivity and Cultural Exchange in Kij Johnson’s Novels of Japan” provides an illuminating reading of Kij Johnson’s innovative exploration of human and nonhuman animal subjectivities in The Fox Woman (2000) and Fudoki (2003). Gordon highlights Johnson’s use of traditional Japanese autobiographical literary forms to bridge gaps not only between an assumed Western contemporary audience and the medieval Japanese setting of her novels, but also between humans and nonhuman animals. These Japanese forms, using the careful eye of the observer and internal examinations of individual subjects, engages what Gordon calls the amborg gaze, and collapses the division between subject and object in human/other animal relations and, perhaps, in relations between humans of different cultures.

Keywords:   Amborg gaze, Animal subjectivity, Japan, Species, Hybrid

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