Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Graphic Novels for Children and Young AdultsA Collection of Critical Essays$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Michelle Ann Abate and Gwen Athene Tarbox

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781496811677

Published to University Press of Mississippi: May 2019

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781496811677.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM Mississippi SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mississippi.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Mississippi, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSSO for personal use.date: 17 September 2021

“Are You an Artist like Me?!” Do-It-Yourself Diary Books, Critical Reading, and Reader Interaction within the Worlds of the Diary of a Wimpy Kid and Dork Diaries Series

“Are You an Artist like Me?!” Do-It-Yourself Diary Books, Critical Reading, and Reader Interaction within the Worlds of the Diary of a Wimpy Kid and Dork Diaries Series

Chapter:
(p.77) 5 “Are You an Artist like Me?!” Do-It-Yourself Diary Books, Critical Reading, and Reader Interaction within the Worlds of the Diary of a Wimpy Kid and Dork Diaries Series
Source:
Graphic Novels for Children and Young Adults
Author(s):

Rachel L. Rickard Rebellino

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781496811677.003.0006

This chapter examines both the extraordinary popularity of text/image hybrid comics diaries created by Jeff Kinney in his Diary of a Wimpy Kid series and Rachel Renee Russell in her Dork Diaries series, as well as the companion texts that have been developed to encourage young readers to generate hybrid diaries of their own. The books are considered as literary junk food that will hopefully give readers an appetite for more intellectually nutritious literature. However, it is argued that rather than being unnecessary literary fluff or destructive garbage, the books promote complex reader–young adultbook engagement through their multimodality and through the two series' do-it-yourself journals, which provide opportunities for students to develop critical literacy skills as they actually write alongside Nikki and Greg.

Keywords:   Jeff Kinney, Diary of a Wimpy Kid, Rachel Renee Russell, Dork Diaries, hybrid comics diaries, children's literature, reader–book engagement

University Press of Mississippi requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.