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Graphic Novels for Children and Young AdultsA Collection of Critical Essays$
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Michelle Ann Abate and Gwen Athene Tarbox

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781496811677

Published to University Press of Mississippi: May 2019

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781496811677.001.0001

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“Walk Together, Children”: The Function and Interplay of Comics, History, and Memory in Martin Luther King and the Montgomery Story and John Lewis’s March: Book One

“Walk Together, Children”: The Function and Interplay of Comics, History, and Memory in Martin Luther King and the Montgomery Story and John Lewis’s March: Book One

Chapter:
(p.298) 19 “Walk Together, Children”: The Function and Interplay of Comics, History, and Memory in Martin Luther King and the Montgomery Story and John Lewis’s March: Book One
Source:
Graphic Novels for Children and Young Adults
Author(s):

Joanna C. Davis-McElligatt

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781496811677.003.0020

This chapter argues that John Lewis's graphic memoir March: Book One, co-written by Andrew Aydin and drawn by Nate Powell, serves three interlocking purposes. First, by working within the comics medium, Lewis, Aydin, and Powell acknowledge the historical centrality of the medium in the dissemination of information to children and young adults not only during the civil rights movement, as in the case of The Montgomery Story, but in the present moment as well. Second, by bringing The Montgomery Story out of obscurity through direct visual and narrative references to the comic, Lewis, Aydin, and Powell not only remind readers of the unique ability of comic art to reach readers in ways that other narrative forms cannot, but simultaneously make the case that the medium played a role in the success of the movement itself. Third, by participating in a long-standing tradition of African American autobiography, Lewis's memoir highlights the particularity of his experience in order to explore the relationship between the past and the present.

Keywords:   John Lewis, March, civil rights movement, Andrew Aydin, Nate Powell, graphic memoir, comics, The Montgomery Story

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