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Comics Art in China$
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John A. Lent and Xu Ying

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781496811745

Published to University Press of Mississippi: May 2019

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781496811745.001.0001

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Animation: From Hand-Crafted Experimentation to Digitalization

Animation: From Hand-Crafted Experimentation to Digitalization

Chapter:
(p.151) Chapter 6 Animation: From Hand-Crafted Experimentation to Digitalization
Source:
Comics Art in China
Author(s):

John A. Lent

Xu Ying

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781496811745.003.0006

Animation in China grew from its austere beginnings in the 1920s, when the Wan brothers used very rudimentary materials and learn-as-you-go skills to produce animated shorts, to an industry today that leads the world in quantity of production. In between were two golden eras where highly aesthetic animation classics were made using Chinese stories, techniques, and materials. Accounting for this prosperity was the availability of time and resources offered by the government-owned Shanghai Animation Film Studio. The situation changed drastically after China went from a planned to a market economy at the end of the twentieth century. The Shanghai studio increasingly was forced to speed up production, to fend for itself in the market, and to compete in a field of hundreds of new studios. In the early 2000s, benefiting from much government support, foreign influences and connections, and digitalized technology, Chinese animation moved into an age of giantism, with all of its inherent problems.

Keywords:   Wan brothers, golden ages, aesthetic animation, Shanghai Animation Film Studio, ink-wash, market economy, giantism

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