Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Faulkner and Print Culture$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Jay Watson, Jaime Harker, and James G. Jr. Thomas

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781496812308

Published to University Press of Mississippi: May 2019

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781496812308.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM Mississippi SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mississippi.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Mississippi, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSSO for personal use.date: 25 September 2021

The Wild Palms, The Mansion, and William Faulkner’s Middlebrow Domestic Fiction

The Wild Palms, The Mansion, and William Faulkner’s Middlebrow Domestic Fiction

Chapter:
(p.203) The Wild Palms, The Mansion, and William Faulkner’s Middlebrow Domestic Fiction
Source:
Faulkner and Print Culture
Author(s):

Jaime Harker

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781496812308.003.0014

This chapter considers the symbiotic relationship between William Faulkner’s writing and women’s domestic fiction, particularly in his novels The Wild Palms and The Mansion. During the interwar period, women’s magazines published a wide range of fiction, both serialized novels and short stories, and the literary influence of women’s magazines continued in the postwar period, when Faulkner published two short pieces in Harper’s Bazaar and Mademoiselle. This chapter argues that Faulkner was aware of this market, targeted it as a publication venue, and shaped his fiction based on the conventions of middlebrow domestic fiction. This argument broadens recent investigation of Faulkner’s catholic engagement with print culture to include a women’s reading and writing community consistently overlooked by literary critics.

Keywords:   middlebrow, domestic fiction, Cold War, women’s magazines, feminist heroines

University Press of Mississippi requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.