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Twenty-First-Century Feminisms in Children's and Adolescent Literature$
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Roberta Seelinger Trites

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781496813800

Published to University Press of Mississippi: May 2019

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781496813800.001.0001

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Speculative Fictions, Embodiment, and the Neoliberal Impulse

Speculative Fictions, Embodiment, and the Neoliberal Impulse

Chapter:
(p.85) Chapter 4 Speculative Fictions, Embodiment, and the Neoliberal Impulse
Source:
Twenty-First-Century Feminisms in Children's and Adolescent Literature
Author(s):

Roberta Seelinger Trites

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781496813800.003.0004

YA dystopias frequently investigate what it means to inhabit a human body; dystopias and other speculative fictions often track how turmoil in the body politic effects subsequent turmoil for the human body itself. This chapter thus relies on material feminism, including ecofeminism, to explore embodiment in literature for the young, and the chapter also examines the nuances of neoliberalism as a concept that complicates twenty-first century feminisms in adolescent literature. This chapter traces a range of novels that follow a spectrum from predictable (and not particularly successful) feminism to more innovative forms of feminism. This chapter thus moves from an examination of Suzanne Collins’ The Hunger Games, to Laini Taylor’s Daughter of Smoke and Bone, Lissa Price’s Starters, Adam Rex’s The True Meaning of Smekday, and Sherri L. Smith’s Orleans.

Keywords:   Dystopia, Cyborg, Neoliberalism, Biopolitics, Biopleasure

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