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The Limits of LoyaltyOrdinary People in Civil War Mississippi$
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Jarret Ruminski

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781496813961

Published to University Press of Mississippi: May 2019

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781496813961.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM Mississippi SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mississippi.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Mississippi, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSSO for personal use.date: 19 September 2021

Epilogue

Epilogue

Chapter:
(p.189) Epilogue
Source:
The Limits of Loyalty
Author(s):

Jarret Ruminski

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781496813961.003.0008

THIS BOOK HAS USED MISSISSIPPI FROM 1860 TO 1865 AS A CASE STUDY to reexamine the nature of Confederate loyalty during the Civil War. Rather than focusing on the war’s outcome, it has examined the war as a process during which multiple loyalties influenced people’s actions. Historians have viewed white Southerners’ wartime behavior in terms of their degree of national commitment to the Confederacy. Although such studies use impressive evidence and sophisticated methodologies, these competing arguments have nonetheless become deadlocked into viewing Confederate nationalism as weak or strong. To bypass this deadlock, this book demonstrates how multiple, coexisting loyalty layers influenced Mississippians’ actions in ways that were often unconnected to their nationalist views. This approach helps makes sense of how the mass accusations of disloyalty in wartime Mississippi were not evidence of widespread unionism or eventual support for Republican Party policies. Rather, this alleged disloyalty revealed how the Confederate state, operating on the ideological framework of protective nationalism, was limited in its ability to directly influence the everyday behavior of its citizens....

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