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The Indian CaribbeanMigration and Identity in the Diaspora$
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Lomarsh Roopnarine

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781496814388

Published to University Press of Mississippi: May 2019

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781496814388.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM Mississippi SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mississippi.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Mississippi, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSSO for personal use.date: 19 September 2021

Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.3) Introduction
Source:
The Indian Caribbean
Author(s):

Lomarsh Roopnarine

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781496814388.003.0008

This introductory chapter provides an overview of Indian Caribbean migration and identity formation. Indian Caribbean people have been a meaningful portion of the migratory workers, traders, professionals, and businessmen whose skills and acumen have helped to develop the Caribbean region. This movement and subsequent contributions have been possible because Caribbean Indians have understood the importance of adapting to Western education and culture to achieve upward social mobility. Since the Second World War, Indians have been migrating from their Caribbean base to their colonial former mother country in Europe and North America, creating a second Indian diaspora after the first wave of indentured migrants to the Caribbean. These Indians overseas are products of twice migration, with a triple consciousness of India, the Caribbean, and Western developed countries. More recently, Indians have acquired a new visibility across the Caribbean, North America, and Western Europe because of political, economic, and social transformation; liberalization of immigration laws; and globalization.

Keywords:   Indian Caribbean migration, Indian Caribbean people, Caribbean Indians, Western culture, Indian diaspora, indentured migrants, twice migration, immigration laws, globalization

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