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The Indian CaribbeanMigration and Identity in the Diaspora$
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Lomarsh Roopnarine

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781496814388

Published to University Press of Mississippi: May 2019

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781496814388.001.0001

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Indian Identity in the Caribbean

Indian Identity in the Caribbean

Chapter:
(p.121) Chapter Seven Indian Identity in the Caribbean
Source:
The Indian Caribbean
Author(s):

Lomarsh Roopnarine

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781496814388.003.0090

This chapter demonstrates how migration has led to the formation of different types of identity among resident Caribbean Indians as well as those living abroad. Two alternative analyses of Indian identity in the Caribbean are presented. The first alternative is Coolieology, that is, a theoretical as well as a practical framework that argues that Indians in the Caribbean have not overcome the indignities of indenture. The second alternative is a multipartite approach that argues that Creole identity (Euro-African) does not apply to a majority of Caribbean Indians. Ultimately, the identity of Indians in the Caribbean can be conceptualized on an ethno-local, an ethno-national, a trans-Caribbean, and a global level. Within all four there is a sense of struggle to maintain these identities. Some overlaps also exist in this multipartite structure of Indian identity.

Keywords:   migration, Caribbean Indians, Indian identity, Coolieology, indenture, Creole identity

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