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Teaching the Works of Eudora WeltyTwenty-First-Century Approaches$
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Mae Miller Claxton and Julia Eichelberger

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781496814531

Published to University Press of Mississippi: May 2019

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781496814531.001.0001

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Post Southern and International

Post Southern and International

Teaching Welty’s Cosmopolitanism in “Going to Naples”

Chapter:
(p.141) Post Southern and International
Source:
Teaching the Works of Eudora Welty
Author(s):

Stephen M. Fuller

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781496814531.003.0019

Urging that audiences read Welty’s fiction in contexts post southern and global, this chapter explores formal and thematic aspects of her short story “Going to Naples.” It opens by underlining Welty’s travels, her numerous national and international journeys, and alludes to several examples of her fiction without southern settings. It then turns to “Going to Naples,” a prominent example of a narrative that demonstrates this supra-regional and supra-national curiosity. In addition, the chapter identifies the entrenched reading habits of New Criticism and the undervaluation of women writers with historic resistance to recognizing the unorthodox and experimental characteristics of her work. The chapter concludes by recommending post structural/feminist assessments of her work but encourages all theoretically-informed readings that expose new insights.

Keywords:   “Going to Naples”, Post southern, Travel, New Criticism, Poststructuralism

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