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Teaching the Works of Eudora WeltyTwenty-First-Century Approaches$
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Mae Miller Claxton and Julia Eichelberger

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781496814531

Published to University Press of Mississippi: May 2019

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781496814531.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM Mississippi SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.mississippi.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University Press of Mississippi, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in MSSO for personal use.date: 30 May 2020

“He Going to Last”

“He Going to Last”

Why Phoenix Jackson’s Grandson Still Matters

Chapter:
(p.172) “He Going to Last”
Source:
Teaching the Works of Eudora Welty
Author(s):

Dawn Gilchrist

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781496814531.003.0023

This essay looks at how AP students in rural poverty respond to Eudora Welty’s “A Worn Path.” In a tiered assignment that includes both conversation and writing, college-bound, rural, white and Native American students create questions that require an analysis of the story’s meanings. It is their exploration of Welty’s characterization, her depiction of class, and her use of allegory as a layering device that allows them to understand her theme. However, it is their self-conscious awareness of the academy’s interest in uplifting them as the downtrodden that authentically connects Welty’s underclass to their own lives.

Keywords:   Rural students, Poverty, Welty’s underclass, Appalachian, Southern

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