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Quentin TarantinoPoetics and Politics of Cinematic Metafiction$
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David Roche

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781496819161

Published to University Press of Mississippi: September 2019

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781496819161.001.0001

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“Lookin’ Back on the Track, Gonna Do It My Way”

“Lookin’ Back on the Track, Gonna Do It My Way”

The Use of Preexisting Music

Chapter:
(p.224) Chapter Six “Lookin’ Back on the Track, Gonna Do It My Way”
Source:
Quentin Tarantino
Author(s):

David Roche

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781496819161.003.0007

The study of pre-existing music confirms the poetics and politics of these films come together in the very contemporary notion that everything, notably art and identity, is a re-representation. If the songs featured on the original motion picture soundtracks have unquestionably played an important role in constructing the Tarantino brand as an emblem of cool retro, their functions in the films have always been varied and complex: reinforcing and establishing structural and thematic relationships (notably regarding character relations), endowing specific scenes with a certain tone or emotional ambience, and also highly contributing, on a metafictional level, to the political subtexts by way of intertextuality.

Keywords:   Film music, Genre, emotion, intertextuality, theme

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