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Greek Music in America$
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Tina Bucuvalas

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781496819703

Published to University Press of Mississippi: September 2019

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781496819703.001.0001

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“Health to You, Marko, with Your Bouzouki!”: The Role of Spoken Interjection in Greek Musicians’ Imagined Performance World in Historical Recordings Made in America and Abroad1

“Health to You, Marko, with Your Bouzouki!”: The Role of Spoken Interjection in Greek Musicians’ Imagined Performance World in Historical Recordings Made in America and Abroad1

Chapter:
(p.137) “Health to You, Marko, with Your Bouzouki!”: The Role of Spoken Interjection in Greek Musicians’ Imagined Performance World in Historical Recordings Made in America and Abroad1
Source:
Greek Music in America
Author(s):

Michael G. Kaloyanides

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781496819703.003.0008

In “’Health to you, Marko, with your Bouzouki!’: The Role of Spoken Interjection in Greek Musicians’ Imagined Performance World in Historic Recordings,” Michael Kaloyanides categorizes and analyses the role of tsakismata, the common verbal interjections in Greek music performances, in both live and recorded performances. Not only is the world of the recording studio a topic that has been rarely explored, the verbal interjections are a practice that is ubiquitous but again rarely illuminated. As a music scholar who was raised and performed within Greek diaspora communities, Kaloyanides is unusually well-equipped to interpret the differences in usage between interjections in live community events as opposed to the recording studio conventions.

Keywords:   Tsakismata, Greek music, Greek diaspora, Recording industry, Ethnic recordings

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