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Race and RadioPioneering Black Broadcasters in New Orleans$
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Bala James Baptiste

Print publication date: 2019

Print ISBN-13: 9781496822062

Published to University Press of Mississippi: January 2020

DOI: 10.14325/mississippi/9781496822062.001.0001

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Epilogue

Epilogue

Chapter:
(p.125) Epilogue
Source:
Race and Radio
Author(s):

Bala J. Baptiste

Publisher:
University Press of Mississippi
DOI:10.14325/mississippi/9781496822062.003.0009

O. C. W. Taylor was a visionary. He saw the slings and arrows piercing the minds and souls of black folk in the city and offered broadcast programming that obliterated negative stereotypes. In 1966, he became the first black television announcer and producer. Later Vernon Winslow transitioned from disc jockeying popular music and moved to gospel, a genre within which he had a signature voice. Before supremacists allowed Taylor and Winslow into their broadcast studios, Cosimo Matassa, who operated a small recording studio, ran a phone line from the building and connected it to the transmitter at WNOE and WWEZ. He allowed the pioneers to broadcast live from his business, J&M Recording Studio. Among the last pioneer unfolded herein is Larry McKinney who worked at WMRY, WYLD, and WNNR in 1975.

Keywords:   stereotypes, WWOM-TV, gospel, Cosimo Matassa, WNNR

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